2,012 reputation
419
bio website clownx.net23.net
location Some place
age 25
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen 2 days ago

I'm a Programmer / Business Analyst...


Mar
28
comment “Ella es nuestra madre” - Why is “nuestra” feminine?
+1, and LOL for "(unless..., no, always feminine)"
Feb
12
comment What vowels and consonants are used in the Spanish language?
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post.
Jan
16
comment In what era was “que suave” used?
@FernandoGarcía True, however even the use of qué chido is tricky, as the acceptance of the phrase is dependent on your social group, and it could also sound kinda outdated for some younger people. And of course there's also the vulgar equivalent qué chingón
Dec
26
comment Are Boomeranging Telescopic Phrase Mazes impossible to translate?
The question is about the difficulty of translating, not about spanish itself, therefore is off-topic
Sep
17
comment Uso de “en al frente”
@Dombey I'm from Chihuahua. Also just for the sake of Spanish improvement, one of the de is misplaced, the question should be ¿De qué parte de México es Usted? (otherwise it'd imply I own a part of México)
Sep
17
comment Uso de “en al frente”
el frente de un salón es la parte delantera sin una distincion especifica, usualmente enfrente de los estudiantes y es donde suele encontrarse el profesor o profesora, además de la pizarra
Sep
17
comment Uso de “en al frente”
Interesante, debe ser alguna diferencia regional puesto que el frente de un salón es una expresión conocida y usada en México, mientras que nunca oí hablar de el frontal
Aug
31
comment Meaning of “que ni que”
@RodrigoA.Pérez It beats the point of what? I don't have a specific reference per se, however spanish is my first language, I read a lot of things in spanish, use it every day and I see it everywhere on media and in person...
Aug
26
comment How to translate “have a crush on somebody”?
@JoulSauron I get your point and the same is also true in Mexico, however enamorado for example while having the main meaning just as the one you mention, can also be used for crush
Aug
26
comment What's the correct Spanish word to mean “as” in this context
@WendiKidd You're welcome, and I'd say the meaning of both ways is the same
Aug
26
comment ¿“Los auriculares” o “el auriculares”?
@Theta30 indeed, thanks for the suggestion...
Aug
26
comment ¿“Los auriculares” o “el auriculares”?
@WendiKidd see my updated answer :) also, I'd say auriculares/audifonos is valid for both 1 set and multiple sets of headphones...
Jul
25
comment How to translate “if any”?
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post.
Jul
25
comment hover/survoler/sobrevolar? cuál sería la mejor traducción?
@deStrangis Ciertamente, lo agregaré a la respuesta...
May
16
comment Could General Pablo Morrillo have been misunderstood as saying “Spain does not need wise people.”?
No hay problema, vote por tu respuesta porque es buena, simplemente quise hacerla mas legible :D
Apr
23
comment “¿Me lo puedo probar?” vs “¿Lo puedo probar?”
@leonbloy Gracias, tengo un teclado en inglés, por lo que es confuso usar los acentos, y olvide cambiar el corrector ortográfico a español :)
Apr
9
comment When using object pronouns, should I say “la van a ver a” or “la van a ver”?
Oh, I see, but yes, the a has no place in your second sentence, because the a in the first one is part of verla so, van a verla is equivalent in this case to la van a ver
Apr
17
comment Shorter/alternate version of refrigerator
I can say refri it's indeed used in other Mexican states (at least I know of Chihuahua and Aguascalientes), so I'd say it's fairly global Mexican wide.
Mar
6
comment What's the difference between rezar and orar? Are there any other ways to say 'to pray'?
You're correct about the uses you mention, and yes suplicar may come up as more reverent. It's also worth mentioning that spanish varies greatly from place to place (I know this is truth for all of Latin America and Spain), so even in Mexico, its use differs greatly from North to South...
Feb
28
comment How do you say “I'm gonna get you!”?
I agree it sounds more neutral (I guess everywhere but in Spain)