1,124 reputation
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location Buenos Aires, Argentina
age 35
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen Aug 21 at 9:53

May
16
comment Cuándo usar “usar” o “utilizar”
I really don't see much difference in meaning, except "utilizar" sounds a bit pretentious in most cases; almost like it often happens in English, when "utilize" is used instead of "use" (except in English, dictionaries seem to indicate that there's a specific meaning for "utilize" that does not exist for "use"; which doensn't happen in Spanish, to my knowledge)
May
11
comment ¿Cómo se dice, “How's it going”?
It's "¿cómo te/le va?", "¿cómo va?" or "¿cómo va todo?". "¿Cómo se va?" means "how do you go/how one goes (to that place)".
Apr
27
comment Translation of “so close”
@Sergio. In Alfredo's example, "nomás" means "solamente". You could replace it with "nada más", indeed. But, what I meant is that you can't always replace "nada más" with "nomás", as in the example I gave (and so that's why I said it's a word on its own). Regarding the origin, I don't know where it comes from; the fact that is used in many countries (not only Central America, also Argentina, Uruguay, etc) makes me think it's not necesarily Mexican, but I might be wrong, of course. Do you have any sources that trace the origins of the word?
Apr
27
comment Translation of “so close”
@Sergio Romero. Sorry, but I disagree. It's not slang (although it's not formal); it's not Mexican (it's used widely across Latin America); and it's not a contraction of "nada más" (it's a word by itself, and arguably comes from "no más"; in any case, the word has a number of meanings and it's not just a contracted form of "nada más"; you can't say "No hay nomás que hacer" instead of "No hay nada más que hacer", for instance). I'm not sure if "ahí nomás" is used to mean "so close" in other places, though (it's not the case in Mexico, according to Alfredo O).
Apr
19
comment Meaning and connotations of “gringo”
I agree about the Argentinian usage. Gringo used to be a rather neuter term (or even affectinate), not pejorative, to refer mostly to Italian immigrants or their descendants (at least during most of the 20th century). "Gringo" used to be a very common nickname too. Nowadays, my perception is that "gringo" is used almost exclusively to refer to American (as in the rest of Latin America) and it tends to be mildly derogatory.
Mar
22
comment Translation of “to be fluent (in a language)”
@Janoma. I don't mean to be argumentative, but I disagree. As I understand it, the question asks for a way to translate the ability to speak fluently. I don't think "elocuencia" fits that definition. Hence my comment. I don't think mastering a language necessarily means being eloquent, either. To me, "elocuencia" is related to the ability to tell something in an engaging way, to put it in simple words (and I guess it could even be argued that someone could be "elocuente" without fully mastering a language - though generally I'd say that "elocuencia" implies mastery of a given language).
Mar
21
comment Translation of “to be fluent (in a language)”
@Janoma. Yes, that's exactly what I meant. Speaking fluently would then be "hablar con soltura", "de corrido", etc, but not necessarily eloquently.
Mar
21
comment Translation of “to be fluent (in a language)”
I disagree with "elocuencia". Most people I can think of right now are not really "elocuentes" in Spanish (or any other language, for that matter) even though they are native, fluent speakers.
Feb
7
comment What does “haiga” mean?
I think it's pretty much like "thunk" (as past participle) in English. It's not unheard of, it follows an existing conjugational pattern (that of "caer" in Spanish or "to drink" in English, for example), but is deemed incorrect and substandard (and would make you look illiterate).