1,104 reputation
49
bio website
location Buenos Aires, Argentina
age 35
visits member for 2 years, 2 months
seen Apr 15 at 13:38

Jul
4
comment Why do oler and saber take the preposition “a”?
@Miyamoto Akira. Yes, that's exactly what I was saying.
Jul
3
answered Why do oler and saber take the preposition “a”?
Jul
3
comment Where does the expression “Oe oe oe oe oe, … oeee, … oeee” come from?
@Javi. Ah, I see, I've always heard "olé" here (though it sounds like "oé" when chanted by a crowd). It seems it's differnt in Spain.
Jul
2
answered Where does the expression “Oe oe oe oe oe, … oeee, … oeee” come from?
Jun
26
comment How would you build the spanish counterpart of “truthiness”?
@Joze. My pleasure.
Jun
23
comment Translation needed for “chairman”
Well, yes, but just as "guerra" is a mispelled version of a Germanic word, if you want to look it that way. My point is that "líder" it's not slang. It's just a Spanish word of English origin.
Jun
23
comment Translation needed for “chairman”
Líder is not slang, though.
Jun
19
comment How to say “Pick up”
Yes, I get your point, but I still think "recoger" is free of having a double entendre unless you deliberately mean to make a pun.
Jun
19
comment How to say “Pick up”
Well, I guess if you say that you are evidently trying to make a pun (which is why I said "depending on the context or the intention of the speaker").
Jun
19
comment How to say “Pick up”
Not saying that "levantar" isn't a valid option. But even though "recoger" could have that meaning depending on the context or the intention of the speaker, it's certainly not the primary and most usual sense of the word (at least for me, native speaker from Argentina, where "coger" does indeed have an immediate sexual meaning, as you obviously know). I'd say "recorger" is pretty safe to use, at least here.
Jun
15
comment How would you build the spanish counterpart of “truthiness”?
@Joze. "Verosímil" fits this definition quite well: "something that has the quality of seeming or being felt as true but is not necessarily true".
Jun
12
answered Translation needed for “school board”
Jun
3
answered ¿Me pueden ayudar a deconstruir las siguientes oraciones? Can you help me deconstruct these sentences?
May
31
comment Translating “should” expressing future desirability
@Leandro. It's not wrong and there's no need to yell. "No obstante, con este sentido, la lengua culta admite también el uso sin preposición". buscon.rae.es/dpdI/SrvltConsulta?lema=deber. Shame on you if you are a Spanish teacher as you said in your answer.
May
31
comment Translating “should” expressing future desirability
"Debieres estudiar con nosotros mañana" no es precisamente un ejemplo de buen uso del lenguaje. El futuro del subjuntivo es de por sí un arcaísmo que se mantiene sólo en algunos ámbitos específicos. Aun así, dudo que en algún momento se haya usado como en la frase anterior. Dos opciones correctas serían "deberías" (que va con tilde) o "debieras", ambas aceptadas por razones históricas. "Deber de" más infinitivo significa suposición o conjetura y "Deber" más infinitivo significa tanto suposición como obligación en el uso corriente; además está aceptado por la RAE.
May
22
awarded  Commentator
May
20
awarded  Enlightened
May
20
awarded  Nice Answer
May
16
comment Cuándo usar “usar” o “utilizar”
I really don't see much difference in meaning, except "utilizar" sounds a bit pretentious in most cases; almost like it often happens in English, when "utilize" is used instead of "use" (except in English, dictionaries seem to indicate that there's a specific meaning for "utilize" that does not exist for "use"; which doensn't happen in Spanish, to my knowledge)
May
12
awarded  Enthusiast