762 reputation
28
bio website janoma.github.io
location Chile
age 30
visits member for 2 years, 6 months
seen Apr 11 at 1:05

I used to be a mediocre student. Now that I study for fun, I'm getting better at it.


Jan
31
awarded  Yearling
Jan
31
awarded  Yearling
Mar
22
comment Translation of “to be fluent (in a language)”
@JuanPabloCalifano but the question is about mastery, not just fluidity, so elocuente is correct.
Mar
21
comment Translation of “to be fluent (in a language)”
@JuanPabloCalifano that's because most people are actually not elocuentes, even native, fluent speakers. Elocuencia is a state of mastery that not everybody achieves.
Feb
15
comment Continuing education after high school
This does not seem like the place to ask this. This Q&A website is "for students, teachers, and linguists wanting to discuss the finer points of the Spanish language", not for career advice.
Feb
13
revised Convention for group-recited, gender-specific, self-referencing pronouns
Minor edit.
Feb
13
comment Good News/Chat/Cultural Podcasts in Spanish?
Voting to close. I suggest you use a search engine to find podcasts. This website is "for students, teachers, and linguists wanting to discuss the finer points of the Spanish language", a description your question does not seem to fit.
Feb
13
answered Convention for group-recited, gender-specific, self-referencing pronouns
Feb
12
comment Why is sport in Spanish 'deporte' and not 'esporte'?
True. What I wanted to say is that it should not be expected that words that sound similar should have similar meanings, and viceversa.
Feb
11
comment Why is sport in Spanish 'deporte' and not 'esporte'?
I don't think that's a valid reason to expect "sport" to be translated as "esporte" (or any word to be translated in a particular way), because English and Spanish do not share roots (in general). Canonical example: library, which is not the same as librería. The "method" would be sort of valid if you did this between French, Italian and Spanish, for example, because you have common roots in Latin and Greek.
Feb
11
comment What Spanish term (or terms) work best to describe a glass jar as used for coffee, jam, etc?
@Richard: note that <algo> café means "brown <something>", so "tarro café" is "brown jar". You have to say "tarro de café" for "coffee jar".
Feb
10
comment Is there a trick to remembering 'llevar' and 'traer'?
+1 for Laura's comment. I sort of imagine the confusion you might have, but it'd be much better if you provided a couple of examples of actual uses where you don't know which word to use.
Feb
8
comment Throughput in Spanish?
@Artur can you add a bit of context? "The best translation" is just too vague, because it depends on too many things. For example, where you are going to use the word? How formal is the language you're using? Also, it seems like you're offering three options only, when the best translation might not even be one of those.
Feb
8
answered Difference between “susto” and “aprensión”
Feb
7
awarded  Commentator
Feb
7
comment When is uppercase used in English but lowercase in Spanish?
+1 for the answer, I think the uses in dates, languages and nationalities are the most common in which you can see this difference. However, titles in books, magazines or printed works in general are a different thing. For example, a publication might have its own styling guidelines and require capital letters in titles of chapters, but not sections. When used consistently, it is not necessarily harmless or really disrespectful of the rules.
Feb
7
awarded  Quorum
Feb
7
comment pensaban que no había suficientes habitaciones VS no pensaban que hubieran suficientes habitaciones
@Flimzy I think you should post that comment as an answer. You have my +1 at least.
Feb
7
awarded  Critic
Feb
6
answered Translation of “ASAP”