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bio website retrincos.net
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visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen Apr 9 at 14:56

Apr
9
answered Por vs. para vs. a vs. de
Feb
11
answered Usage of 'hubo'
Dec
20
answered When to use 'a' and when to use 'para'?
Dec
20
answered How do I say ‘what happens if…’ in Spanish?
Dec
20
comment Equivalent for “a nod's as good as a wink”
+1 for "A buen entendedor, pocas palabras bastan". Very popular and often used.
Oct
17
answered “Empanada”, “Emparedado”, and their genders
Oct
17
comment Insultos blandos pero coloridos
+1 por los insultos en gallego y la fuente. Mi tío me llamaba "milhomes" de pequeño, y pensaba que era algo bueno hasta que crecí un poco :-)
May
30
awarded  Yearling
Mar
28
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
12
comment Translating “young man” and “young woman”
Great answer. +1 :-)
Dec
2
awarded  Editor
Dec
2
awarded  Commentator
Dec
2
comment Why is “Enrique” pronunced as though it has a double “r”?
Done. Hope I haven't make it worse with my explanation O:-)
Dec
2
revised Why is “Enrique” pronunced as though it has a double “r”?
added 390 characters in body
Nov
28
answered Why is “Enrique” pronunced as though it has a double “r”?
Nov
23
comment Translating “looking forward to”
"Hope/with/desire". It could mean just hope ("Espero que no llueva") or security about something ("Espero que llegue pronto"). It depends a lot on context.
Nov
23
comment What is the difference between different ways of expressing desire and intention?
I concur with @hippietrail. "Me gustaría" is "I would like to".
Nov
23
comment Age range of niño, chico, muchacho, joven, etc
I'm not sure I've heard "joven" and "mozo/moza" in Spain in any other than humourous context. They're a bit dated, in my opinion. We use "moza" in galician to refer to one's girlfriend or to young girls in general (look for "Domingo das Mozas" here: lugoturismo.com/fiestas/?idioma=i&pag=interesnacional), but it's pretty regional.
Nov
23
comment Age range of niño, chico, muchacho, joven, etc
"Chaval" and "chavala" are very used here in Spain, specially for teenagers (under 20) and sometimes for young adults (under 30).
Nov
17
comment Why is “agua” masculine in singular form and feminine in plural? “El agua” / “Las aguas”
Ouch. Very right, @dusan. My fault. A shame I can't use my own language properly :-)