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Apr
24
comment “You look good” versus “You smell good”
As an addition, I would say that "(tú) hueles bien" to mean "your sense of smell is good" is rather odd. In fact, I would say it could mean something more like "you are good at smelling" which is also rather strange. To say "your sense of smell is good" I would say "tienes buen olfato".
Apr
24
comment When is “al” not interchangeable with “a el”?
Here's what DPD says. Summarizing, it's what you said: if "El" is part of the name, and therefore capitalized, it is not contracted.
Apr
19
comment What's the origin of words ended in letter “j”?
I agree. Reloj, boj and carcaj are the only ones I've ever heard from that list.
Apr
19
comment Translation of “so close”
@GonzaloMedina I've certainly never heard "ya mero" is Spain
Apr
17
comment Shorter/alternate version of refrigerator
Personally, I use "frigo" quite often, but it's very informal. "Frigorífico" it's as difficult to say (or even more) as "refrigerador", so it's not very helpful for the OP, I guess. "Nevera" is far easier, an used a lot in Spain, but I have no idea if it's used at all in Mexico or the US.
Apr
13
comment Do mi and mío have different connotations?
I totally agree with this answer (I'm from Spain too)
Apr
13
comment Do mi and mío have different connotations?
As simple as: Esta casa es mía = This house is mine and Esta es mi casa = This is my house
Apr
4
comment Is “tobogán” an acceptable word for “slide” throughout the Spanish speaking world?
I've never heard anything apart from tobogán in Spain either. Well, except the Basque txirrista in the Basque Country.
Feb
28
comment What is English translation of this short audio file in Spanish ?
The clip says "Estoy muy encantada conocerte. Un beso grande.", which has a grammatical mistake. It should be "[...] encantada de conocerte".
Feb
22
comment Difference between “mas” and “más”
I don't think their pronunciation is the same. Mas is "átona" and más is "tónica", so they're not pronounced exactly the same. But I don't know how to explain the difference, really.
Feb
20
comment How might you say a child is “cute” in Spanish?
@AlfredoO: Added an edit about the regional use
Feb
14
comment Why does “mostrar a” mean “to show” and not “to show to”?
@Nathan: The problem with the "personal a" is that it is very difficult to distinguish the direct object and the indirect object when they are both people. In fact, as you've already pointed out in the question, "muéstranos al Padre" can mean both "show us the Father" or "show us to the Father".
Feb
9
comment Throughput in Spanish?
When I was learning queueing theory for telecommunications, we used the word throughput, in English. I guess they had the same problem translating it, so they just used the word in English.
Feb
8
comment Difference between “oreja” and “oído”
@Javi: Yes, and it's also the participle of oír, and something about firearms and explosives. But regarding the difference between oído and oreja, I think the anatomical meanings are just enough. By the way, oreja also means "sentido de la audición", so in that meaning they're just the same.
Feb
3
comment Translation of “to wind (a rope, hose, string, cord, etc.)”
Bobinar is another one, which means basically "devanar". And arrollar, too.
Feb
3
comment What does “haiga” mean?
I don't know if this story about the origin of "haiga" as "big car" is true, but it is funny.
Feb
2
comment Pregunta sobre pronombre: preguntárnoslas
@Cadenza: I meant that "presentárnoslas", to me, sounds like "introduce them to us" not "introduce us to them", which is what the question asked. However, since you introduce people "both ways", it doesn't matter so much. But let's change the verb and use "entregar". Entregárnoslas is "give them to us", but "give us to them"?
Jan
30
comment to drink: beber vs. tomar
I know it's transitive. I didn't mean to imply otherwise. I just wanted to add a typical usage.
Jan
30
comment Pregunta sobre pronombre: preguntárnoslas
@Javi: yes, but the OP says "us" is the direct object and "her friends" the indirect object. I'll write it in English, to make things clear: "Gabriela does not want to introduce us to her friends". "Presentárnoslas" doesn't match exactly that sentence (by meaning yes, because the introduction is mutual), I think. But maybe it does, according to the link you provide.
Jan
30
comment to drink: beber vs. tomar
When inviting someone, or asking what they want, tomar is very used, as in "¿qué tomas?" or "¿qué van a tomar?"