4,246 reputation
1819
bio website
location Bilbo, Spain
age 36
visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Nov 11 at 15:34

Jul
4
comment Preferred word for 'T-shirt'
Also, polo for polo shirt
Jul
4
comment When should we use articles before nouns and when are articles not required?
We definitely say "la leche": la leche es blanca, la leche tiene calcio, me gusta la leche... I would say that almost always nouns go with an article. In fact, we often have problems knowing when not to use an article in English.
Jul
1
comment Watch TV Show with English or lower quality Spanish Subtitles
I would agree if the wording were "not totally correct". But the OP says it "is completely different" (imagine Spanish-from-Spain audio with Spanish-from-Mexico subtitles, they can be completely different). In that case, I would say the subtitles don't help much.
Jun
27
comment Definition of “burris”
Could it be an altered form of "burro"?
Jun
18
comment How do you introduce yourself on the phone?
I've gone through a few links and "soy..." or "habla..." seem to be the most recommended ways.
May
17
comment Identifying masculine and feminine words
True. In this case, it doesn't happen often. I was thinking in exceptions to "rules" in languages in general. Those exceptions often happen in very usual words. Like, irregular verbs both in Spanish and English.
May
17
comment Identifying masculine and feminine words
Más referencias a "esta agua"
May
17
comment Identifying masculine and feminine words
@Arkana Los casos ambiguos, se pueden comprobar tanto en el link que he dado como en sus definiciones de la RAE. También es muy posible que algunas palabras vayan perdiendo su "ambigüedad" con el tiempo y el uso. Y respecto al agua, la RAE insiste en que para las palabras que empiezan con a tónica sólo cambian los artículos "la" y "una" por "el" y "un". Para los demás, la forma femenina. Lo dice en el link en mi respuesta, y también en la ortografía
May
15
comment Is it possible to use definite articles before proper nouns? If so, when?
Where I live (north of Spain) it is pretty common to use the article with restaurant names. I'm not so sure about formal things like newspapers or commercials, but in the everyday use, we use it all the time: "Ayer cené en el X", "me han dicho que en el Y se come muy bien"...
May
14
comment When do you use 'para' and when do you use 'por'?
possible duplicate: spanish.stackexchange.com/q/34/376
May
7
comment El uso de “comerse”
Imaginemos el cuento de Hansel y Gretel, en el que los niños (se) comen las paredes de la casita de chocolate... ¿Cuál es la diferencia ahí? Yo sé que es mejor con "se", pero no sé explicar por qué...
Apr
29
comment ¿Qué significa la expresión “echar toda la carne al asador”?
Yo diría que en España se usa más en la forma "poner toda la carne en el asador". De hecho, es la que indica la RAE en el diccionario
Apr
15
comment Linguistic Use of Spanish Characters Keyboard Layout
Check diéresis in the RAE dictionary or in the DPD. Actually, it seems that it goes on the first vowel of the diphthong to be "broken", so I guess it can be any vowel. In the links, there are examples on i (vïuda) and u (rüido, süave).
Apr
9
comment Linguistic Use of Spanish Characters Keyboard Layout
The diaeresis can also be used with i, but it is a marginal use. In poetry and the like, it is used to force a hiatus on what otherwise would be a diptong.
Apr
9
comment Linguistic Use of Spanish Characters Keyboard Layout
In older keyboards tilde did not appear. It had to be written with ALT+126. It's been probably added because in programming and the Internet is quite common.
Mar
14
comment Alternatives to “ya me voy”
@Rorok_89 you mean "when used in a reflexive way does not connete walking in formation", don't you? Anyway, here in Spain there are places where "marchar" (without the reflexive" is used to mean "leave": "¿Ya marchas?" or "marcho, que llego tarde". In fact, RAE says "marchar" means "irse".
Feb
20
comment Duda entre “sino” y “si no”
Otra cosa: "sino" es también un sustantivo que significa "destino" o "hado" (fate, en inglés).
Feb
20
comment Duda entre “sino” y “si no”
Sin embargo, hay múltiples ejemplos de "si no" incorrectamente escrito como "sino".
Jan
28
comment What is the rule for cualquier, cualquiera, and cualesquiera?
@Leandro Sorry but no. As I said in my previous comment, "antes que" predates "antes de que". It comes directly from Latin "ante quam". Check the DPD. So in the beginning it was "antes que" or "antes de", depending on what comes after, and they merged into "antes de que". Now "antes de que" is more used, but that doesn't make the "original" one incorrect. Also, "antes de que" was at first taken as "dequeísmo".
Dec
10
comment Spanish words for couple, few, handful, several, etc
Although 'par' means literally 'two', it is sometimes used to mean 'a few'.