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2d
comment lords and ladies
Also, keep in mind that sometimes films and series are not very correctly translated. For example, they often translate "ladies and gentlemen" as "damas y caballeros", whereas the normal usage is "señoras y señores" (though we've heard the wrong one so often that it doesn't sound so bad anymore). Another one is when they translate, "What were you doing? I was cleaning..." as "¿Qué estabas haciendo? Limpiaba...", when the normal answer would be "estaba limpiando..." (my guess is that it's because it's shorter and therefore easier to sync with the actor's lips).
2d
comment lords and ladies
milord (you can find it in the dictionary written like that) and mi lady are frequently used in films set in or around the Middle Ages, to address someone of high status, without adding the name. So it would be "Hello, Lord Stark" or "Hello, milord".
2d
comment Grammatical explanation of “He”
@SergioVelásquez Actually, Haber = Poseer = Tener, though, to be fair, it's an old usage.
2d
comment ¿Cómo se traduciría al español la palabra “snippet”?
+1 Fragmento de código es la traducción más habitual, en mi experiencia. Es la que usa Microsoft en Visual Studio, o Adobe, o IBM...
2d
comment ¿Se pueden distinguir las patatas fritas en español?
Sé que hay gente que usa o reconoce "chips" para llamar a las de bolsa, pero no sé cómo de extendido está. Por otro lado, cuando estuve en Inglaterra, algunos distinguían entre french fries (más finas y crujientes, como en McDonald's y similares) y chips (más gruesas)...
Jul
27
comment Por qué la palabra “español” no tiene acento/tilde sobre la o?
Supongo que es distinto enseñar a escribir un idioma al que sabe hablarlo de enseñar a hablar, leer y escribir, todo a la vez...
Jul
27
comment Por qué la palabra “español” no tiene acento/tilde sobre la o?
Cuando yo lo estudié, nos lo explicaron justo al revés. Es decir, en lugar de decirnos cuál es el "acento natural" y que hay que poner tilde cuando el acento no está en su lugar natural, nos explicaron en qué casos se pone tilde. Era así: en palabras agudas (última sílaba acentuada), se pone tilde si termina en vocal, en N o en S; en palabras llanas (acento en la penúltima) se pone tilde si no termina en vocal, N o S; en palabras esdrújulas y sobreesdrújulas (acento en la tercera o cuarta sílaba por el final), siempre.
Jul
22
comment ¿Qué tipo de palabra es «alto»?
Check the Wikipedia article on Stop signs for some history, variations and more. It says that PARE is used in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, Uruguay and Venezuela and ALTO is used in Mexico and Central American countries.
Jul
13
comment How to understand the following translation?
@Diego Realmente, en el original le llama Calvin Klein
Jul
13
comment “Que tan?” slang for “How are you?”
Just a note to add that ¿qué tal? is short for ¿qué tal estás? (how are you?)
Jul
6
comment Do “rapidez” and “velocidad” have similar technical meanings as “speed” and “velocity”?
I'm with @Gorpik here. In Spain, velocidad is used as speed all the time in normal speech (límite de velocidad, velocidad de la luz, velocidad de crucero, exceso de velocidad...). I don't even remember using different words for speed and velocity when learning Physics. I think we used velocidad for speed and "vector velocidad" for velocity.
Jul
6
comment How + adjective construction
En esta pregunta hay una discusión sobre el tema. Aunque la pregunta original es específicamente sobre cuán, las respuestas incluyen tambien "cómo de", "qué tan", "qué"...
Jun
15
comment Why does “every eight days” mean once a week?
@HéctorE I'm from Spain too and though I have never heard that exact idiom either, I've heard "[de] hoy en ocho", which means "next week, on the same weekday as today". I guess it's similar to using "15 días" to say two weeks.
Jun
2
comment Why would “breakfast” be translated as “lunch”?
When I hear someone use almuerzo, I'm not always sure what they mean, since I've heard it used for breakfast, lunch and also morning snack.
May
15
comment Conditional or Future for Tener
How is the answer provided not conditional? It's as conditional as the original sentence. The conditionalness of the sentence is determined by the use of if/si. Those introduce a condition. A different matter is the conditional conjugation of verbs, which is used in some kinds of conditional sentences.
May
15
comment how do you pronounce “los” when conjugated?
"The letter o in Standard Spanish always has the same pronunciation". I sometimes think that English speakers (or speakers of any other language with more vowel sounds than Spanish) would maybe disagree. I mean, we might pronounce different o sounds, or a sounds, or... but the important thing is that the pronounciation doesn't change the meaning, as opposed to English (to live/live music).
Feb
13
comment Difference between casa and hogar
Yes, that's what I meant, that "casa" can have the "home" meaning too.
Feb
13
comment Difference between casa and hogar
Well, if you look them up in RAE, you'll see that hogar means "casa" or "familia que vive junta" plus other unrelated meanings. And casa also means "familia", so I think the dictionary (at least this one) does not really answer the question.
Feb
13
comment Difference between casa and hogar
How about "sentirse como en casa"? It does not refer to "a house", but rather to "home".
Jan
23
comment Suffixes interchangeability
Other regional variations are "-ico" (very used in Navarra) and "-uco" (in Cantabria)