4,316 reputation
1919
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location Bilbo, Spain
age 37
visits member for 3 years, 3 months
seen Feb 16 at 9:01

Feb
13
comment Difference between casa and hogar
Yes, that's what I meant, that "casa" can have the "home" meaning too.
Feb
13
comment Difference between casa and hogar
Well, if you look them up in RAE, you'll see that hogar means "casa" or "familia que vive junta" plus other unrelated meanings. And casa also means "familia", so I think the dictionary (at least this one) does not really answer the question.
Feb
13
comment Difference between casa and hogar
How about "sentirse como en casa"? It does not refer to "a house", but rather to "home".
Jan
23
comment Suffixes interchangeability
Other regional variations are "-ico" (very used in Navarra) and "-uco" (in Cantabria)
Jan
23
comment Why would you ever say “el vino está delicioso”?
Yes, you could say "este vino es delicioso", but then maybe the flashcard should have been "this wine is delicious"...
Sep
9
comment Using El, La, Los and Las when it seems that they should not be used
Spanish speakers often have trouble knowing when to omit the article in English.
Jul
23
comment Vegetables in Spanish
Often, "bocadillo vegetal" is a "bocadillo" which has lettuce and tomato, or other vegetables. It can have tuna as @JoulSauron says, but also chicken or other meats. Just google for "vegetal de pollo" and you'll see. I've never understood it, by the way.
May
30
comment Translating “if I had to” in Spanish
"Si hubiese tenido que hacerlo, habría saltado la cuerda"
May
30
comment Translating “if I had to” in Spanish
It's not hubiese, but habría. The subjunctive goes in the "si..." part, and the conditional in the other one.
May
30
comment Translating “if I had to” in Spanish
Tuviera and tuviese are exactly the same. If you look at any conjugation table, you'll see that it always says "tuviera o tuviese" (or so it should). For example, this one
May
30
comment Translate “…when you're done” in Spanish
I disagree with your disagreement. It's cuando termines. I don't remember the grammatical rules well enough to explain the reasons, but it's the kind of thing a native speaker knows. It doesn't matter if it's a doubt or an expectation. You have to use the subjunctive. Cuando + present infinitive implies a contiuous action "cuando termino el trabajo, (siempre o habitualmente) guardo la pala". In this case, it is a one-time action and not a continuous one.
May
28
comment What is the difference between “es” and “está”?
@Em1 No, you are right. The second person imperative is "está" (RAE conjugation table), or "esté" for the formal use (usted). Now, I think I've never heard "está" used like that, but it's quite common in its pronominal(?) form: estate. Some examples: estate quieto, estate seguro de que [...], estate tranquilo...
May
28
comment What is Login in Spanish?
Registrar would be the translation for "sign in", I think.
May
9
comment How do you say a “shot” referring to alcohol?
I've often seen "golpe" used in recipes for cocktails. See some examples here
May
5
comment Where did “pico de gallo” get its name?
@c.p. Care to give a better explanation?
Apr
1
comment What rule governs this usage of the apostrophe in this case?
Exactly, it's just a typo.
Apr
1
comment Punctuating quoted sentences
This is the usage I prefer, and I find more logical, but I've seen it the other way around, too.
Mar
12
comment What is “Amaury”?
As some answers have said, it's just a male name. Amaury is a novel by Dumas, published in 1843. You can see it listed in the French or Spanish versions of the Wikipedia article on Dumas. It doesn't appear in the English version, though.
Feb
18
comment How does “Vino con vino” translate to “She came with wine”?
"tú/usted vino" es incorrecto, tú viniste; él/ella/usted vino
Feb
18
comment How to handle the ambiguity of the verb “presentar”, when both objects (DO and IO) are present?
Related: spanish.stackexchange.com/q/3758/376