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 Yearling
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May
30
comment Translating “if I had to” in Spanish
Tuviera and tuviese are exactly the same. If you look at any conjugation table, you'll see that it always says "tuviera o tuviese" (or so it should). For example, this one
May
30
comment Translate “…when you're done” in Spanish
I disagree with your disagreement. It's cuando termines. I don't remember the grammatical rules well enough to explain the reasons, but it's the kind of thing a native speaker knows. It doesn't matter if it's a doubt or an expectation. You have to use the subjunctive. Cuando + present infinitive implies a contiuous action "cuando termino el trabajo, (siempre o habitualmente) guardo la pala". In this case, it is a one-time action and not a continuous one.
May
28
awarded  Informed
May
28
answered Translation of “ahora”
May
28
comment What is the difference between “es” and “está”?
@Em1 No, you are right. The second person imperative is "está" (RAE conjugation table), or "esté" for the formal use (usted). Now, I think I've never heard "está" used like that, but it's quite common in its pronominal(?) form: estate. Some examples: estate quieto, estate seguro de que [...], estate tranquilo...
May
28
comment What is Login in Spanish?
Registrar would be the translation for "sign in", I think.
May
22
awarded  Critic
May
9
comment How do you say a “shot” referring to alcohol?
I've often seen "golpe" used in recipes for cocktails. See some examples here
May
5
comment Where did “pico de gallo” get its name?
@c.p. Care to give a better explanation?
May
1
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
1
comment What rule governs this usage of the apostrophe in this case?
Exactly, it's just a typo.
Apr
1
comment Punctuating quoted sentences
This is the usage I prefer, and I find more logical, but I've seen it the other way around, too.
Mar
18
reviewed Reject Are there native-born Spanish speakers that can't trill their R's?
Mar
18
reviewed Reject Are there native-born Spanish speakers that can't trill their R's?
Mar
12
comment What is “Amaury”?
As some answers have said, it's just a male name. Amaury is a novel by Dumas, published in 1843. You can see it listed in the French or Spanish versions of the Wikipedia article on Dumas. It doesn't appear in the English version, though.
Feb
18
comment How does “Vino con vino” translate to “She came with wine”?
"tú/usted vino" es incorrecto, tú viniste; él/ella/usted vino
Feb
18
comment How to handle the ambiguity of the verb “presentar”, when both objects (DO and IO) are present?
Related: spanish.stackexchange.com/q/3758/376
Jan
23
revised Como se dice “ what's the use” en castellano?
added 3 characters in body
Dec
27
awarded  Yearling
Dec
13
comment Why is “Santiago” the equivalent of “James”?
I think this question really leads to the question of why in English Jacob = James. It seems that "James" came from France