4,226 reputation
818
bio website
location Bilbo, Spain
age 36
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen 16 hours ago

Aug
6
awarded  Enlightened
Aug
6
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
23
comment Vegetables in Spanish
Often, "bocadillo vegetal" is a "bocadillo" which has lettuce and tomato, or other vegetables. It can have tuna as @JoulSauron says, but also chicken or other meats. Just google for "vegetal de pollo" and you'll see. I've never understood it, by the way.
Jun
1
awarded  Enlightened
Jun
1
awarded  Nice Answer
May
30
comment Translating “if I had to” in Spanish
"Si hubiese tenido que hacerlo, habría saltado la cuerda"
May
30
comment Translating “if I had to” in Spanish
It's not hubiese, but habría. The subjunctive goes in the "si..." part, and the conditional in the other one.
May
30
comment Translating “if I had to” in Spanish
Tuviera and tuviese are exactly the same. If you look at any conjugation table, you'll see that it always says "tuviera o tuviese" (or so it should). For example, this one
May
30
comment Translate “…when you're done” in Spanish
I disagree with your disagreement. It's cuando termines. I don't remember the grammatical rules well enough to explain the reasons, but it's the kind of thing a native speaker knows. It doesn't matter if it's a doubt or an expectation. You have to use the subjunctive. Cuando + present infinitive implies a contiuous action "cuando termino el trabajo, (siempre o habitualmente) guardo la pala". In this case, it is a one-time action and not a continuous one.
May
28
awarded  Informed
May
28
answered Translation of “ahora”
May
28
comment What is the difference between “es” and “está”?
@Em1 No, you are right. The second person imperative is "está" (RAE conjugation table), or "esté" for the formal use (usted). Now, I think I've never heard "está" used like that, but it's quite common in its pronominal(?) form: estate. Some examples: estate quieto, estate seguro de que [...], estate tranquilo...
May
28
comment What is Login in Spanish?
Registrar would be the translation for "sign in", I think.
May
22
awarded  Critic
May
9
comment How do you say a “shot” referring to alcohol?
I've often seen "golpe" used in recipes for cocktails. See some examples here
May
5
comment Where did “pico de gallo” get its name?
@c.p. Care to give a better explanation?
May
1
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
1
comment What rule governs this usage of the apostrophe in this case?
Exactly, it's just a typo.
Apr
1
comment Punctuating quoted sentences
This is the usage I prefer, and I find more logical, but I've seen it the other way around, too.
Mar
18
reviewed Reject suggested edit on Are there native-born Spanish speakers that can't trill their R's?