205 reputation
15
bio website plus.google.com/…
location UK
age 33
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen Oct 21 '13 at 9:33

I am of Argentine origin and I moved to the UK in 2003.

I have worked for 5 years in the Finance sector as IT Manager and then Media as Head of SEO. I currently work in London for a media agency as Head of Technical Services in charge of automating processes and developing solutions to industry challenges.

In my free time I like to play with code and I am currently exploring the fascinating world of Arduino.

I speak Spanish and English and I am also very fond of learning new languages, Japanese being one of my main interests.

Check out my G+ profile if you would like to get in touch.


Jan
8
comment Algún to represent an indefinite quantity?
No worries. I understand now. I know this might sound silly but, have you considered typing your sentences in Google and seeing: How it auto-completes and when it says "Did you mean?" that might help you test your sentences.
Jan
7
comment Algún to represent an indefinite quantity?
I stand by what I said and I was merely pointing out your misspellings so you could correct your post, not to make a point of it or anything. If you would like to edit your post I will be more than happy to delete my comment.
Jan
6
comment Algún to represent an indefinite quantity?
I suggest you re-read your post, there are several grammatical and spelling errors: "meany", "bolasa", "Ay" (should be Hay). Also, "Hay alguna canica quebrada en la bolsa" translates best to "Are there any broken marbles in the bag" not "Is there any broken marble in the bag".
Dec
29
comment What exactly are the “passive se” and “impersonal se”?
I am not sure from a strictly grammatical perspective but, from an every day use viewpoint, the "se" in both cases are definitely not reflexive. They are as you say "impersonal" and generalise the question or affirmation to a wider implication. "Se puede tocar esto? translates to "Can this be touched?" and "Se habla español" translates to "Spanish is spoken".
Dec
21
comment Ordinary, regular, run-of-the-mill, average, etc
From the other answers I would also favour the use of "un hombre corriente" (a common man) but I would personally always use "un hombre cualquiera".
Dec
21
comment Ordinary, regular, run-of-the-mill, average, etc
Likely. I am Argentine and so this is perfectly acceptable. See the movie "Un hombre cualquiera" filmaffinity.com/es/film716207.html about a man who pretends to have achieved fame and money in front of the town he was born in.
Dec
21
comment Ordinary, regular, run-of-the-mill, average, etc
It can. It would depend on the context of the sentence. You can call someone "un cualquiera" in which case this becomes more like " a nobody".