535 reputation
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location Buenos Aires, Argentina
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visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen Oct 10 '13 at 9:43

Name: Eduardo
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Profession: English-Spanish Translator / Electronic Engineer
Languages: Spanish (native), English (fluent), French (basic)


Jan
27
answered Translation of “Take ___ for granted”
Jan
27
answered Translation of “Who are you writing to”
Jan
26
answered Break: romper vs. quebrar vs. quebrantar vs. partir
Jan
26
answered Two nouns in a row, or, is it OK to omit “de”?
Jan
24
comment Translation of “Great!”
Joya, masa, bárbaro, buenísimo and copado are commonly used in informal every-day speech in Argentina. Bárbaro and buenísimo, however, are a little more formal/safer to use than the others.
Jan
17
comment Is there a translation for “cougar”?
Yo diría que es un tema cultural. El estereotipo de cougar hace referencia normalmente a una buena posicion económica, y en los países con menor grado de desarrollo no debe ser tan común este tipo de situaciones. No es que no existan, pero probablemente en mucha menor medida, al punto de no existir un término tan específico. Viejo verde y otros hacen referencia a esta diferencia de edad, pero hay tantos parámetros en juego que es casi tema para otro post. Respecto a la pregunta original, cougar, parecería no tener una traducción exacta. Vieja verde aunque se entiende, no me suena.
Jan
16
comment Is there a translation for “cougar”?
Si, es cierto, comehombres no hace referencia a la edad de quien porta el nombre. Pero robacunas tampoco hace referencia a que se trate de una mujer. Creo que va a tener que arriesgarse a algún tipo de ambigüedad, que tal vez se pueda eliminar por contexto.
Jan
16
revised Why “¿Cómo te llamas?” means “¿Cuál es tu nombre?”?
clarification on reflexive against pronominal/pseudo-reflexive
Jan
16
comment Why “¿Cómo te llamas?” means “¿Cuál es tu nombre?”?
I know you made a note on that, but what I'm trying to say is that despite the note, the statement is still false.
Jan
16
comment Why “¿Cómo te llamas?” means “¿Cuál es tu nombre?”?
Apparently llamar is not the best example of a strictly pronominal verb because it can be conjugated without the pronoun (with a different meaning, I agree, but still). Examples of strictly pronominal verbs would be arrepentirse, quejarse, jactarse and dignarse, because none of them can actually be used without the pronoun.
Jan
16
answered Why “¿Cómo te llamas?” means “¿Cuál es tu nombre?”?
Jan
16
answered 7up in Spanish speaking countries
Jan
16
awarded  Critic
Jan
16
comment Translation of “should have”
I'm sorry, but you are plain wrong. Should have does not mean debería but debería haber. The English version of Debo hacer los deberes antes de mañana would be I should do my homework by tomorrow or if you wish I should have my homework done by tomorrow, but in this case the function of have is completely different from the OP's example. As Diego Mijelshon explained in the other answer, it literally means, debería haber and is always followed by a participle, since haber acts as an auxiliary instead of a main verb as in your previous example.
Jan
16
awarded  Supporter
Jan
16
answered Is there a translation for “cougar”?
Jan
4
revised When should the subjunctive be used after 'cuando'?
removed quote block. had to edit something more to reach 6 chars (this limitation is annoying)
Jan
4
suggested suggested edit on When should the subjunctive be used after 'cuando'?
Jan
4
comment When should the subjunctive be used after 'cuando'?
If it's not a quote maybe you could just remove the quote block and say it straight. Being the first sentence in your post it will stand out. Let me try an edit, you can re-edit if you want.
Jan
4
awarded  Commentator