545 reputation
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location Buenos Aires, Argentina
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visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen Oct 10 '13 at 9:43

Name: Eduardo
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Profession: English-Spanish Translator / Electronic Engineer
Languages: Spanish (native), English (fluent), French (basic)


Dec
20
awarded  Yearling
Dec
20
awarded  Yearling
Feb
10
answered Is there a trick to remembering 'llevar' and 'traer'?
Feb
7
answered Singular and plural of pants, shorts, jeans, etc
Feb
6
revised When is “me encanta” romantic?
added 226 characters in body
Feb
6
answered When is “me encanta” romantic?
Jan
30
revised Translation of “Who are you writing to”
edit after discussion with Juanillo.
Jan
30
comment Translation of “Who are you writing to”
@Juanillo It seems its optional then. +1 for the find.
Jan
28
comment Translation of “Who are you writing to”
@Juanillo I put a note on the use of "¿Con quién te escribes?" as an alternative. What you say about an exchange is correct, it's just another example of when or how it should be used. Depending on the context, this alternative could even mean the same thing. If for example, the person is always exchanging letters with other people. "¿A quién le escribes (esta vez)?" could have the very meaning as "¿Con quién te escribes (esta vez)?"
Jan
28
comment Translation of “Who are you writing to”
@Juanillo IMO "Estoy escribiendo a mi amigo" is also ungrammatical. If instead of using that tense, you just used simple present (escribo instead of estoy escribiendo) you would see that the pronoun is still missing. "¿A quién le escribes? Le escribo a mi amigo." "¿A quién escribes? Escribo a mi amigo*" (?). The last answer is obviously missing a pronoun, put it before Escribo as in "Le escribo a mi amigo" or after it "Escribole a mi amigo". The general rule is "you should always use le when talking about doing something to another person". The same rule applies to questions.
Jan
28
comment Translation of “Who are you writing to”
Escribe muy bien is a clear case of an intransitive use of escribir, but I don't think it's the same case. Regarding its use, maybe it's common to hear that (which I think is incorrect) for the same reason it's common to hear Who are you writing to? instead of Whom are you writing to? or To whom are you writing?. Many English speakers have trouble using whom and, knowingly or unknowingly use who instead. So I think the Spanish expression may have its roots on similar reasons.
Jan
28
comment What is “ya va” in Venezuelan Spanish?
Va is the conjugation for the singular of the third person. It may have originated on situations where the person saying ya va is actually saying that another person will be with you in a moment; but nowadays it's used for all kinds of situations.
Jan
28
answered What is “ya va” in Venezuelan Spanish?
Jan
28
comment Translation of 'verbose'
Verbose would translate to verboso, but why do you need the exact translation? Are you translating some documentation? Or you just want to know what it means?
Jan
28
answered Translation of 'verbose'
Jan
27
comment Translating “They don't call me … for nothing.”
@CesarGon: After OP's clarification, Por algo me llaman would be the best alternative. Upvoting, sorry for the previous comment.
Jan
27
revised Translating “They don't call me … for nothing.”
clarified OP's question
Jan
27
comment Translating “They don't call me … for nothing.”
It could be idiomatic but it doesn't fit to the question; it has a completely different meaning.
Jan
27
comment Translating “They don't call me … for nothing.”
(showing that some nickname someone has has been confirmed by something they just did or are about to do) ???
Jan
27
answered Translating “They don't call me … for nothing.”