1,841 reputation
413
bio website sessionfactory.blogspot.com
location Buenos Aires, Argentina
age 34
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen Apr 17 at 0:54

I'm a pro-agile, ALT.Net-centric software architect working as an independent contractor.


Nov
29
comment Why is “Enrique” pronunced as though it has a double “r”?
@LauraMoyàAlcover I changed your S example because Israel, being a Hebrew word, is usually pronounced with a soft R by jews (native Spanish speakers, that is)
Nov
26
comment Greetings for presents and cards
@belisarius not that I know...
Nov
25
comment Greetings for presents and cards
@Alenanno I did not intend to be harsh, but firm (sorry if it came out wrong). It is disrespectful because: (1) Passover has nothing to do with Easter (2) It has been celebrated for several more centuries (3) Easter was, for centuries and until very recently, a good excuse to beat up or murder jews, so it's not something we want associated with our holiday.
Nov
25
comment Greetings for presents and cards
@belisarius done.
Nov
25
comment Greetings for presents and cards
@Alenanno why do you assume most people know what Christmas is and not what Passover is? (Actually, we don't even have to deal with "most" people, only the educated ones that are likely to use this site) Besides, calling it "Jewish easter" is disrespectful.
Nov
25
comment Greetings for presents and cards
@dusan yes, that's common.
Nov
23
comment What does “lo” in “(no) lo es” refer to?
@hippietrail it's not loísmo.
Nov
22
comment Age range of niño, chico, muchacho, joven, etc
@vartec you're right; mozo is used there instead (which means waiter in Latin America)
Nov
22
comment ¡Buenas! greeting in morning
It's clear that buenas is an informal greeting, but these days most of the world is informal. Maybe you wouldn't use it in court, with the military, or talking to a new corporate customer, but I'd say 95% of the time buenas is fine. (I do admit that living in Buenos Aires I might be biased. Perhaps this is not the case in more conservative countries/cities)
Nov
22
comment ¡Buenas! greeting in morning
I wouldn't say buenas could ever be considered disrespectful. Only the most formal situations would require buenos días, etc
Nov
21
comment Definition of escuela and colegio
A side note: you have not accepted any of the answers you got on this site. People might stop answering them if they feel their effort is not appreciated.
Nov
18
comment Is there a standard, most common, or most neutral Spanish term for “chat room”?
Chatear is used extensively in Latin America, so "salón de chat" is not uncommon.
Nov
17
comment “ir a «infinitive»” vs. future tense
@hippietrail edited.
Nov
17
comment “ir a «infinitive»” vs. future tense
@hippietrail, I didn't say it's an Argentinean thing. I think the future tense is used more in Spain, but I'm not sure about all latin american countries.
Nov
17
comment How to choose between “carecer” and “faltar”?
@hippietrail yes, almost always. The only exception is when it's used in an answer, so the object is implicit: -¿Tienes dinero? -Carezco [de dinero]
Nov
17
comment How prevalent is the phrase “qué padre”?
@JaimeSoto yes, in The Simpsons (used by the children).
Nov
17
comment Single or multiple word names of numbers
If you look at the search results for "diez y seis", they all refer to a particular event. Dieciseis is the accepted modern spelling.
Nov
16
comment Are there native-born Spanish speakers that can't trill their R's?
Not as an adjective. But you can say about someone with this problem le patina la erre (slightly derogatory depending on the context) or no le sale la erre (descriptive).
Nov
16
comment Are there native-born Spanish speakers that can't trill their R's?
@hippietrail, I'm not aware of a scientific name for it.
Nov
15
comment How prevalent is the phrase “qué padre”?
There's also "copado" in Argentina...