1,891 reputation
513
bio website sessionfactory.blogspot.com
location Buenos Aires, Argentina
age 35
visits member for 3 years
seen Nov 8 at 21:52

I'm a pro-agile, ALT.Net-centric software architect working as an independent contractor.


Jan
29
answered Should I include “a” after “conocemos”?
Jan
29
answered Should I use preterit or imperfect to express something that used to happen repeatedly?
Jan
29
answered When should I attach the indirect and direct object pronoun to the end of a verb?
Jan
28
answered Translation of 'verbose'
Jan
26
comment Two nouns in a row, or, is it OK to omit “de”?
Puede ser por pereza o por impacto visual...
Jan
26
answered Two nouns in a row, or, is it OK to omit “de”?
Jan
25
comment Translation of “bloody” etc. for frustration (colloquialisms)
I wouldn't think of "orto" as strong. The thing is, we don't use any "pseudo-swear" words like maldito here.
Jan
22
revised Translation of “bloody” etc. for frustration (colloquialisms)
edited body
Jan
21
answered Translation of “bloody” etc. for frustration (colloquialisms)
Jan
14
comment Why is “Enrique” pronunced as though it has a double “r”?
@Petruza it's true that a majority of the people incorrectly pronounce Israel with a strong R, and that the RAE supports that view. You are also correct in that jews pronounce it in it's original form for sociological reasons more than linguistical ones. I still believe that all proper names should be pronounced as close as possible to the originals.
Jan
14
comment Why is “Enrique” pronunced as though it has a double “r”?
@Petruza what if there is no way to represent the original sound according to Spanish rules (as is the case with Israel)? Another example: Shanghai. The RAE is great, but they make a lot of mistakes when they try to impose a particular academic view over accepted usage (like they did with "Yidis", which has been always written as Idish)
Jan
14
comment Why is “Enrique” pronunced as though it has a double “r”?
@Petruza foreign names are not pronounced by applying Spanish phonetic rules. Otherwise, we'd pronounce "Michael Jackson" Mee-cha-EL HAC-son.
Jan
11
comment Why is “Enrique” pronunced as though it has a double “r”?
@Petruza It's debatable, but it just wasn't the best example; that's why I changed it.
Dec
26
comment When to use “tratar de” and when to use “intentar” for “to try to”?
Well, how can you be sure I'm not a computer? :-D Google is right in this case, except for the one I pointed out.
Dec
26
answered When to use “tratar de” and when to use “intentar” for “to try to”?
Dec
24
comment Translating “Thanks in advance”
+1. This is more natural, and what's usually seen in formal emails/letters.
Dec
16
comment Why is 'estoy' used when saying “I'm related to”
Yes, it's always estar. Not sure about the philosophical explanation :-) However, you use ser to state all specific relationships, biological or not (ella es mi suegra)
Dec
16
answered Why is 'estoy' used when saying “I'm related to”
Dec
14
answered Why isn't “good morning” “buenas mañanas”?
Dec
10
comment Translating “young man” and “young woman”
@Joze yes, that's true. In a formal context you might even call a 10 year old señor.