1,917 reputation
514
bio website careers.stackoverflow.com/…
location
age 37
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen Jul 18 at 18:32

My Professional Profile.

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Mar
15
answered Best way to translate 'uneducated', meaning lacking formal schooling
Mar
15
comment Best way to translate 'uneducated', meaning lacking formal schooling
I disagree with both of you; with Javi, because iletrado is a very common word, and with Tomas, because iletrado is not an appropriate word to refer to someone that lacks formal schooling, which is what the question is about. I would even argue that calling someone iletrado, unless you are referring to a person that can't read and write, is a very rude word to use. For example: Eres un iletrado is just as rude as calling someone ignorant: Eres un ignorante. The author of this blog: gazapping.blogspot.com never finished grammar school and you couldn't call him iletrado
Mar
14
comment How to respond to ¿Cómo estás?
Another one: Será decirte que regular para no preocuparte.
Mar
12
revised Plug vs Socket: Interchangeable?
added 968 characters in body
Mar
12
comment Plug vs Socket: Interchangeable?
@Javi, Dusan, you guys are correct. I've heard people using enchufe to refer to a toma corriente. I will amend my answer.
Mar
12
awarded  Nice Question
Mar
12
answered Plug vs Socket: Interchangeable?
Mar
11
revised What is the meaning of “melaza” in the song “Caras Lindas”?
edited body
Mar
11
answered What is the meaning of “melaza” in the song “Caras Lindas”?
Mar
9
revised I need a Spanish word list for statistical analysis (as complete as possible)
added 485 characters in body
Mar
9
answered I need a Spanish word list for statistical analysis (as complete as possible)
Mar
9
revised Quizás or quizá, which one is preferred?
added 1 characters in body
Mar
8
accepted Quizás or quizá, which one is preferred?
Mar
8
comment Quizás or quizá, which one is preferred?
Javi, thanks for the graph, very interesting stuff. So the form quizás exists even before the 1800's, huh? Google es definitivamente una maravilla :)
Mar
8
asked Quizás or quizá, which one is preferred?
Mar
6
comment Translation of “first time doing something”
+1. Initially I translated exactly as you suggest you would do it in Spain but jrdioko wanted to know if the literal translation would be fine, which it is. It sounds awkward but not necessarily incorrect.
Mar
6
revised Translation of “first time doing something”
added 1 characters in body
Mar
6
comment Translation of “first time doing something”
@jrdioko that's better :) I will use yours.
Mar
6
answered Translation of “first time doing something”
Mar
6
comment Different words for “servant”
@jrdioko Siervo is sort of an archaism in the sense that this word is found on very old texts (think of the Bible) to refer to what nowadays we would call empleado, obrero, etc. A siervo is more like a slave (esclavo) nowadays, which is why this word is found frequently in old literature. Have you heard someone say something like "Tengo 10 siervos trabajando para mi" when referring to people? If I hear someone referring to another person as siervo I would feel offended. If you read the word in a newspaper, for example, it's probably used in the context of 21st-century slavery.