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seen Oct 14 at 4:50

Feb
17
comment Translations of 'anyway'
Thanks, I think 'Cambiando de tema' might be a little too direct for the situation. I think this is a time where an idiom works best, so I like 'por cierto' better
Feb
3
comment Translation of mild, medium, and hot (food spiciness)
My native friend from Peru also suggested the translations I gave. Maybe a regional thing?
Feb
2
comment When it is okay to translate food dishes names?
Using the Spanish name makes all my friends think I'm an amazing exotic cook. Like when I tell them I cook 'Arroz con carne y salsa de tomate' which in English sounds really lame =P (I usually end up saying it extravagantly like an Italian for some reason)
Jan
24
comment Studying Spanish at school in a Spanish speaking country
I live in New Zealand, Im talking about public education but I doubt private would be any different. I believe it is because we only study literature in 'English' class not the actually language itself. That and the fact that it is almost never compulsory to study a 2nd language (except in private schools) so they never teach these things.
Jan
22
comment Translation of “bloody” etc. for frustration (colloquialisms)
Aha, I have heard this on Mexican Youtube shows but never knew quite how to translate it, ty
Jan
20
comment Translation of “bloody” etc. for frustration (colloquialisms)
Yeah I suppose they are used more in some places than others. I'm from New Zealand and they are very common here. Also these words may not be used much in other regions but I think that they would be easily understood/recognised.
Jan
19
comment Are there any words in Spanish that are very difficult to translate to English?
I've come across lots of other translations such as: crook, scoundrel, cheeky etc.. I've heard it in contexts where the person is calling someone a sinvergüenza to insult them using one of the above translations or 'shameless' as you mentioned. Also I've heard it being used as a friendly sort of 'shameless' used to describe a kind of outgoing person who's not embarrassed by anything.
Jan
18
comment Translation of “I have a feeling…”
Thanks, perfect =) Gotta love false cognates ^^
Jan
16
comment Translation of “Are you ok?” or “Are you alright?”
I would use "¿Te encuentras bien?" especially if i knew the person was sick or not feeling very well and "¿Estás bien?" more generally like Sergi mentioned =)
Jan
16
comment Translation of “What's wrong?”
May I also add that you can also change the connotations of your questions by adding words to the end. Eg. ¿Qué te pasa chiquito? - A compassionate question ^.^ ¿Qué te pasa boludo? - A little less friendly >.<
Jan
16
comment Studying Spanish at school in a Spanish speaking country
Thanks, that's exactly what i wanted to know =)
Jan
16
comment 7up in Spanish speaking countries
Thanks. The reason i didn't expect 7up to be naturalized was because of the fact that the seven is always written as the number not the word =) But I suppose with media such as TV and radio, you frequently hear it as well as read it.
Jan
12
comment Translation of “What goes around comes around”
I haven't added translations as all of these and more can be found with one quick Google search
Jan
12
comment Translation of “cheesy”
Also in Argentina
Jan
12
comment Translation of “awkward” (as in “an awkward situation”)
Wouldn't 'torpe' be better translated as uncoordinated or clumsy?
Jan
11
comment Can I learn to roll my R's?
Having lived in Argentina for a while, this is mainly the case for 'rr' more than 'r' especially in the north
Jan
11
comment How to say instead (when at the end of a sentence)
Muchas gracias =) Tambien puedo decir "Usa Y en lugar" ? No se porque pero suena un poco raro
Dec
7
comment Backchannels (listener responses) in Spanish
yeah verdad is used too