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seen Apr 10 at 4:21

Jan
22
accepted Translation of “bloody” etc. for frustration (colloquialisms)
Jan
20
comment Translation of “bloody” etc. for frustration (colloquialisms)
Yeah I suppose they are used more in some places than others. I'm from New Zealand and they are very common here. Also these words may not be used much in other regions but I think that they would be easily understood/recognised.
Jan
20
asked Translation of “bloody” etc. for frustration (colloquialisms)
Jan
19
comment Are there any words in Spanish that are very difficult to translate to English?
I've come across lots of other translations such as: crook, scoundrel, cheeky etc.. I've heard it in contexts where the person is calling someone a sinvergüenza to insult them using one of the above translations or 'shameless' as you mentioned. Also I've heard it being used as a friendly sort of 'shameless' used to describe a kind of outgoing person who's not embarrassed by anything.
Jan
19
answered Are there any words in Spanish that are very difficult to translate to English?
Jan
18
comment Translation of “I have a feeling…”
Thanks, perfect =) Gotta love false cognates ^^
Jan
18
accepted Translation of “I have a feeling…”
Jan
18
asked Translation of “I have a feeling…”
Jan
17
accepted Argentine slang 're'
Jan
17
accepted Learning programming in a Spanish speaking country
Jan
17
answered Translation of “Are you ok?” or “Are you alright?”
Jan
16
awarded  Commentator
Jan
16
comment Translation of “Are you ok?” or “Are you alright?”
I would use "¿Te encuentras bien?" especially if i knew the person was sick or not feeling very well and "¿Estás bien?" more generally like Sergi mentioned =)
Jan
16
comment Translation of “What's wrong?”
May I also add that you can also change the connotations of your questions by adding words to the end. Eg. ¿Qué te pasa chiquito? - A compassionate question ^.^ ¿Qué te pasa boludo? - A little less friendly >.<
Jan
16
answered Translation of “What's wrong?”
Jan
16
revised Studying Spanish at school in a Spanish speaking country
answer
Jan
16
comment Studying Spanish at school in a Spanish speaking country
Thanks, that's exactly what i wanted to know =)
Jan
16
revised Studying Spanish at school in a Spanish speaking country
some explanation
Jan
16
comment 7up in Spanish speaking countries
Thanks. The reason i didn't expect 7up to be naturalized was because of the fact that the seven is always written as the number not the word =) But I suppose with media such as TV and radio, you frequently hear it as well as read it.
Jan
16
accepted 7up in Spanish speaking countries