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visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Oct 14 at 4:50

Jul
28
comment Subject-Verb Agreement “Estudiar y trabajar resulta…”
Your english sentence sounds way more natural to me if the singular 'results' is used. Not sure if that's just me or not. I would say something like: "The other day I was trying to study and work and the same time. It turned out to be quite a challenge" I wouldn't say: "The other day I was trying to study and work and the same time. They turned out to be quite a challenge" So to me it seems like more sense to say: "Studying and working at the same time (it) always results in a big challenge." Then again I'm not a linguist or anything so maybe this doesn't make sense.
Jul
23
comment “Ir a” versus future tense when asking a question
In my experience in Argentina, I hardly ever heard the future tense. Instead people seemed to use 'ir a' or just the present tense. Not sure if this is common throughout the country though.
May
22
awarded  Critic
May
19
revised How is the second person singular formed with rioplatense “vos”?
edited body
May
19
comment How is the second person singular formed with rioplatense “vos”?
In my original post I meant to say that the -s is often dropped on the indicative... not the imperative =P
May
19
comment How is the second person singular formed with rioplatense “vos”?
Imperative is easy, it's the same as the infinitive voseo. I just mean that imperative differs in tu -> vos. Actually the only thing you wont hear in Rioplatense Spanish is the regular imperative form of 'ir' because they always use 'andá'. You'll hear 'andar' being used lots if you go there =)
May
19
comment How is the second person singular formed with rioplatense “vos”?
Haha yeah, actually im fairly certain that using 'ustedes' for the second person plural isn't actually considered formal... that's just the word they use. Apart from that (in my experience) the Argentinians hardly ever use formal conjugations at all! Haha yeah I do love Rioplatense Spanish, and I always use it even when Im talking to people from other Spanish speaking countries (which is a lot). Luckily I am always understood and no one ever really even comments on it. Although... sometimes I get a bit of a chuckle =p
May
19
comment How is the second person singular formed with rioplatense “vos”?
También estoy aprendiendo portugues brasileño y me confunde mucho! >.<
May
19
answered How is the second person singular formed with rioplatense “vos”?
Dec
7
awarded  Yearling
Apr
18
comment Shorter/alternate version of refrigerator
Also used in Argentina
Mar
29
answered How big are the regional differences in the Spanish spoken in different countries?
Mar
29
comment How big are the regional differences in the Spanish spoken in different countries?
Just an extra note as it's not really an answer. The reason that almost all regional differences in Spanish are generally understood by everyone is most probably because of the media. Everyone watches TV these days or talks to people on the internet, so exposure to other country's regional differences is much higher in todays modern society than it has been in the past. Same reason that English speakers can easily understand English from America/England/etc.
Mar
26
accepted Translation: “To wish” expressing regret
Mar
24
accepted Translation: “so” to begin a sentence
Mar
23
asked Translation: “so” to begin a sentence
Mar
23
asked Translation: “To wish” expressing regret
Mar
23
comment Use of “Veni”? Is it a real word?
+1 This should be an answer
Mar
8
comment Quizás or quizá, which one is preferred?
+1 as I did not even realize that there were two different words >.<
Mar
2
comment Are there other words that can't be written? (like sal-le)
You say this can't be written following normal rules, so what does one write when using this word? Surely there is written text somewhere where this word has appeared? Do people just write 'sal-le' like you have in your question?