536 reputation
212
bio website flickr.com/photos/tacobreath
location Mexico City, Mexico
age 36
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen Mar 21 at 17:04
Hello, I'm Michael.

Mar
27
comment Gusto variant of the verb gustar
@hippietrail Strictly speaking, you are correct. But do you really want to encourage sloppiness?
Mar
27
comment Use of “Veni”? Is it a real word?
@Javi Just because it's prescriptively incorrect doesn't meant it doesn't happen. The numbers I got out of Google were similar to the ones jrdioko got. For my part, I work with people, born in Mexico, who speak and write like this all the time. This makes me more than a little bit depressed, but one needs to be aware of it. Sometimes it helps to think of it as one big hermeneutical exercise, deciphering the incoherent nonsense I receive in my inbox and over the phone.
Mar
14
comment Are “burro” and “aburrir” related?
I invented a Spanish Tom Swifty: —El asno no hace nada — dijo Tomás, aburrido.
Mar
5
comment Connotations of “mortal” (slang)
We use mortal in much the same way in Mexico.
Feb
29
comment What's the meaning of the Mexican expression “se te va el avión”?
@darkajax is correct. This answer is objectively wrong.
Feb
29
comment ¿Cuál es la diferencia entre «también» y «tampoco»?
@Brian Almost: "otro" doesn't take an *in*definite article. It can take a definite article, however: "el otro", "las otras", etc. You are right about "otra persona", though.
Feb
27
comment In what cases are “de” and “para” interchangeable?
"una camisa para algodón" sounds grammatical to me. Incoherent, to be sure. But not ungrammatical.
Feb
10
comment Two nouns in a row, or, is it OK to omit “de”?
spanish.stackexchange.com/questions/1774/… is also relevant here.
Feb
2
comment Usage of fea and rico
Worth noting also that, in English, it can mean two rather different things when food is described as rich. One of these translates directly to Spanish and one doesn't. "Rich in vitamins" can translate to "rico en vitaminas," but you can't use "rico" in the sense of "containing much fat, spice, etc" (cf. wordreference.com/definition/rich). At least not if you want to be understood.
Jan
26
comment Two nouns in a row, or, is it OK to omit “de”?
Entendido, por lo menos en el caso de letreros. Pero, ¿en el sujeto de un correo? Hay límites de espacio también, pero no tan severos como en el caso de letreros. ¿Acaso será pura güeva?
Jan
26
comment esperar: wait vs. hope vs. expect
An excellent question. And, just to complicate things further, "expect" can function not only much like a command, as in your example, but also as a statement of anticipation: "I expect that he'll show up at 9am sharp, because he's very punctual."
Jan
21
comment Names of letters “b” and “v”
Tee hee: pronounce BBVA and BBUBA out loud using uve. Good on the RAE for clearing up the ambiguity!
Jan
21
comment How important are accents in written Spanish?
For people fluent in Spanish, it's probably true that unaccented text isn't much harder to read. However, when I read unaccented text as a beginner, I'd often have to make a second pass over a phrase in order to resolve ambiguities.
Jan
21
comment Most accurate translation of “possum”
This wannabe Latinist saw the headline and immediately thought "puedo!"
Jan
13
comment Can I learn to roll my R's?
It's only true that a single r is like a t in some dialects of English. You wouldn't be doing a Strayan or a Cockney any favors by telling them that.