536 reputation
212
bio website flickr.com/photos/tacobreath
location Mexico City, Mexico
age 36
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen Mar 21 at 17:04
Hello, I'm Michael.

Feb
13
suggested suggested edit on 'vos' vs 'tú' usage by country
Feb
10
answered How does one chain noun adjuncts in Spanish?
Feb
10
comment Two nouns in a row, or, is it OK to omit “de”?
spanish.stackexchange.com/questions/1774/… is also relevant here.
Feb
2
comment Usage of fea and rico
Worth noting also that, in English, it can mean two rather different things when food is described as rich. One of these translates directly to Spanish and one doesn't. "Rich in vitamins" can translate to "rico en vitaminas," but you can't use "rico" in the sense of "containing much fat, spice, etc" (cf. wordreference.com/definition/rich). At least not if you want to be understood.
Jan
26
comment Two nouns in a row, or, is it OK to omit “de”?
Entendido, por lo menos en el caso de letreros. Pero, ¿en el sujeto de un correo? Hay límites de espacio también, pero no tan severos como en el caso de letreros. ¿Acaso será pura güeva?
Jan
26
comment esperar: wait vs. hope vs. expect
An excellent question. And, just to complicate things further, "expect" can function not only much like a command, as in your example, but also as a statement of anticipation: "I expect that he'll show up at 9am sharp, because he's very punctual."
Jan
26
asked Two nouns in a row, or, is it OK to omit “de”?
Jan
21
comment Names of letters “b” and “v”
Tee hee: pronounce BBVA and BBUBA out loud using uve. Good on the RAE for clearing up the ambiguity!
Jan
21
comment How important are accents in written Spanish?
For people fluent in Spanish, it's probably true that unaccented text isn't much harder to read. However, when I read unaccented text as a beginner, I'd often have to make a second pass over a phrase in order to resolve ambiguities.
Jan
21
answered Translation of “bloody” etc. for frustration (colloquialisms)
Jan
21
comment Most accurate translation of “possum”
This wannabe Latinist saw the headline and immediately thought "puedo!"
Jan
17
revised usted and its usage
tidied up a bit -- but it is a very basic and therefore perhaps not appropriate question
Jan
17
answered usted and its usage
Jan
17
suggested suggested edit on usted and its usage
Jan
16
revised Why “¿Cómo te llamas?” means “¿Cuál es tu nombre?”?
fixed grammar
Jan
16
suggested suggested edit on Why “¿Cómo te llamas?” means “¿Cuál es tu nombre?”?
Jan
13
comment Can I learn to roll my R's?
It's only true that a single r is like a t in some dialects of English. You wouldn't be doing a Strayan or a Cockney any favors by telling them that.
Jan
12
answered How formal is cuán? What are the informal alternatives?
Jan
5
awarded  Student
Jan
5
asked What adjective ending to use with “algo masculino y/o algo femenino”