589 reputation
215
bio website flickr.com/photos/tacobreath
location Mexico City, Mexico
age 36
visits member for 3 years
seen Dec 12 at 19:42
Hello, I'm Michael.

Nov
14
answered Direct or indirect object for textear?
Nov
14
comment Direct or indirect object for textear?
So, when somebody speaking Spanish says "textear" that word doesn't exist? Downvoted for blatant linguistic cluelessness.
Nov
7
comment What is the meaning of derezoso? and in this context? or is it perezoso?
@diego Me preguntaba de formas arcaicas también, más por "virtude" que por "derezoso". ¿Cuáles son las fuentes de información que consultas?
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
26
comment Is it OK to end a sentence with an object pronoun (e.g. “He aprendido mucho de los”)
I downvoted this answer because it is incorrect. los is sometimes an article and sometimes a personal pronoun. See lema.rae.es/drae/?val=los
Sep
26
comment Is it OK to end a sentence with an object pronoun (e.g. “He aprendido mucho de los”)
I downvoted this answer because it is incorrect. los is sometimes an article and sometimes a personal pronoun. See lema.rae.es/drae/?val=los
Sep
4
comment Is there a difference between “claro” and “por supuesto”?
Desde luego hay una diferencia.
Sep
4
comment Understanding ya vs. todavía vs. aún
Do you have a reference for "Aún cuando había pagado...."? I'd have written it without the accent. But on further reflection, I wonder if both aun and aún could be correct, depending on what you're trying to say, with aun making your unfulfilled expectation prominent and aún emphasazing the sequence of events.
Aug
25
comment How do you differentiate between walnuts and pecans in Spanish?
@JaimeCruzTriana Another comment says that Brazil nuts are called "nuez de Brasil." I can't recall ever seeing them (or, more likely, paying attention to them (I mean yuck, worst nut ever!)) here in the DF. Nuez de la India is something else. They're called cashews in English, but, just to keep things confusing, their origin is indeed Brazil.
Aug
24
revised How do you differentiate between walnuts and pecans in Spanish?
made (some) changes as suggested by amp
Aug
22
comment How do you differentiate between walnuts and pecans in Spanish?
I'm with @amp on all points and made some edits to this effect. I left nuez china as is although I've never heard it either; I think I've heard pecán/pecanes.
Aug
22
suggested approved edit on How do you differentiate between walnuts and pecans in Spanish?
Aug
15
comment Are there consistent rules for pronouncing “c” and “g”?
@Em1 to generalize, most Latin American dialects are seseo (c, when followed by e and i, and z, in all cases, are pronounced identically to s) and most peninsular dialects are ceceo (c, when followed by e and i, and z, in all cases, are pronounced as θ). In other words, the vast majority Spanish speakers do not pronounce cebolla as [θeˈβoʎa].
Aug
7
comment Are there consistent rules for pronouncing “c” and “g”?
Nice, an answer that's almost correct. You should include information on seseo speakers, though, especially as they vastly outnumber ceceo speakers.
Aug
7
comment Are there consistent rules for pronouncing “c” and “g”?
Wrong. In dialects with the ceceo C before E or I does not sound like an English S. (And, for that matter, an S in those same dialects often does not sound like an English S.) Moreover, G before E or I does not sound the same as an English H.
Jul
4
answered ¿Cómo se dice “más o menos” en inglés?
Jun
21
revised “What the hell” in Spanish
minor addition
Jun
20
suggested approved edit on “What the hell” in Spanish
Jun
10
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jun
7
comment Por y Para for Recipients
"Bizarre" was a polite way of saying "wrong." If you google for "guacamole por aguacate" you get two irrelevant results and if you google for "guacamole por aguacuates" you get zero. I just downvoted this answer. It is wrong.