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May
4
comment How to translate “I can't wait…”
I've also heard it often, but it's clearly wrong. You "deseas algo", not "de algo". You would never hear "Deseo de un coche" or "Deseo de irme", so why would it be any different when you use the same verb in the present tense?
May
3
awarded  Commentator
May
3
comment How to translate “I can't wait…”
No, it doesn't. Using "de" here would be an instance of "dequeísmo", thus incorrect: lema.rae.es/dpd/srv/search?key=desear
May
8
comment How do you say a “shot” referring to alcohol?
OK, I see. So it's one of those words accepted by RAE but never actually used with that meaning. (At least certainly not in Madrid, regardless of whether you managed to get it understood there.)
May
8
comment How do you say a “shot” referring to alcohol?
@Bardo Well, perhaps the barmen are just guessing at what you mean. I doubt you heard that expression from a native speaker, although it might conceivably be a regional difference. I'm Spanish and never heard it used in Madrid or Barcelona (or from anyone else I know for that matter).
May
7
awarded  Critic
May
7
comment How do you say a “shot” referring to alcohol?
@Bardo No, it can't. Nobody says that.
Jan
19
comment How do I say 'I end up' in Spanish?
@joragupra "coger" would definitely be the first and most natural choice for a native speaker in this context, at least in Spain.
Nov
30
awarded  Yearling
Dec
14
comment What is the imperative without pronoun of 'Saber'? Why?
No, it's not; see my answer ;-)
Dec
7
comment What is the imperative without pronoun of 'Saber'? Why?
I knew that was the question but I wanted to say the form that I think it is usually replaced with. As for why it's not used, it's a very interesting question but I have no idea actually.
Dec
7
answered What is the imperative without pronoun of 'Saber'? Why?
Dec
4
revised ¿Existen las palabras «nosotras» y «vosotras»?
corrected "alguna persona" (sounds *very* weird)
Dec
3
suggested approved edit on ¿Existen las palabras «nosotras» y «vosotras»?
Dec
3
answered How to translate “I can't wait…”
Dec
3
comment Article usage before country names
Another observation is that "Estados Unidos" without the article is used as a singular noun.
Dec
3
comment Article usage before country names
In Spain the article is seldom used. See e.g the news about the USA in "El Pais" (one of the main Spanish national newspapers): politica.elpais.com/tag/estados_unidos/a Incidentally, the same is true about "Reino Unido": politica.elpais.com/tag/reino_unido/a
Nov
30
comment Article usage before country names
I agree about "el Reino Unido", but I still think "Me voy a Estados Unidos" would be more common than "Me voy a los Estados Unidos" (although it wouldn't sound unusual either).
Nov
30
awarded  Supporter
Nov
30
awarded  Teacher