2,506 reputation
416
bio website verdewek.com/work
location Galicia, Spain
age 46
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen yesterday

I am a researcher at Incipit, where I read, write, think, have coffee and also write code every now and then.

I have extensive experience in method engineering, software methodologies, conceptual modelling, software development techniques, technical writing and project management.

I'm also a partner in two businesses where we develop large software applications and services, and I participate in standardisation projects with ISO and AENOR.

You can also find me on LinkedIn and I keep a couple of blogs.


May
25
comment ¿Cómo se dice regionalmente “coquetear”?
Nunca he oído "meter fichas" en España.
May
23
comment What is the most universal way to say “keep the change”?
I also hear often "cóbreme 20" ("make it 20"), for example, if the amount to pay is 19.50; it's an indirect way to expres the same thing.
May
11
comment Is there a difference between cilantro and culantro in Spanish?
@Laura: Indeed; Wikipedia says about Eryngium foetidum: "In the United States, where it is not well known, the name culantro sometimes causes confusion with Coriandrum sativum".
May
11
comment Distinguishing “quiz” and “test”
@PeterTaylor: Well, that's another meaning of examen, isn't it. :-) You can also use prueba in that case; see e.g. "prueba de alcoholemia" or "prueba de embarazo". They are still synonyms.
May
7
comment Distinguishing “quiz” and “test”
Some RAE definitions are really hopeless. All exams are carried out to ascertain the knowledge or skills of someone! I wouldn't rely on RAE for this kind of nuanced matters.
May
4
comment How should I translate “he is a pain in the ass”?
@Rellikiox: Never heard "porculero" after 40 years in Spain. Must be a regional thing.
May
1
comment accommodating (as in “Thanks for being so accommodating”)
I have never heard "acomedido" in Spain (but thanks for teaching me a new word). Where is it "most natural"?
May
1
comment “True” meaning of “por cierto”
Fair enough. @Miguel 's answer in meta makes sense IMHO.
May
1
comment “True” meaning of “por cierto”
I am not sure that "por cierto" is used as "certainly" anywhere at all, including America. Can anyone from Spanish-speaking American countries confirm or rebut this?
Apr
30
comment Querer vs Amar & Adorar
@SergioRomero: That is fair enough. I made clear in my answer that I am speaking about Spanish in Spain. I am aware that language usage varies greatly across regions, so it may well be different elsewhere. No problem with that.
Apr
30
comment “True” meaning of “por cierto”
Yes, it was me who downvoted your answer ;-) To be honest, I am not certain that "por cierto" is used as "certainly" anywhere at all, despite what the DRAE says. Definitely it's not used like that in Spain, and I'm looking forward to seeing answers to your question here that may clarify whether it is used like that anywhere. I'd be happy to remove my downvote if somehow we could make it clear that "por cierto" is far from being accepted as a fair translation for "certainly", to say the least. Maybe a pointer to this question would help. What do you think?
Apr
30
comment “True” meaning of “por cierto”
Great question.
Apr
28
comment Translation of “by the way”
"Por cierto" is never used as "surely" or "certainly" in Spain. Let's imagine I am asked "¿Vienes al cine con nosotros?" ("Are you coming to the movies with us?"). Nobody would reply with "Por cierto" to mean "Certainly".
Apr
16
comment How important are accents in written Spanish?
@hippietrail: I get your point. But we shouldn't forget that the correctness of Spanish grammar and orthography is prescribed by a central authority, whereas English is not. Regarding "importance", that's fine, but importance for whom or what? Importance for being understood, for being correct, for keeping up the appearance, etc.? My point is that Spanish has an absolute concept of right vs. wrong, and it is important to be right rather than wrong.
Apr
16
comment How important are accents in written Spanish?
@hippietrail: fair enough; wrong orthography then. But still wrong.
Apr
15
comment What would be a good translation of “to go well with”?
@kelmer: Yes. It sounds a bit less coloquial, though.
Apr
13
comment Are there other words that can't be written? (like sal-le)
Very creative indeed.
Mar
22
comment Why isn't “good morning” “buenas mañanas”?
@Orion: I imagined something like that would be the case; hence "here" in my previous comment.
Mar
22
comment Why isn't “good morning” “buenas mañanas”?
@Orion: Indeed. English is the odd one here.;-)
Mar
15
comment Best way to translate 'uneducated', meaning lacking formal schooling
+1; Still, I wouldn't assume that everyone understands that "college" is the proper translation for "universidad"; please see spanish.stackexchange.com/questions/432/… A better way of putting "sin estudios universitarios" in English is, in my opinion, "with no tertiary education" or even "with no university education.