2,645 reputation
517
bio website about.me/cesargon
location Galicia, Spain
age 47
visits member for 3 years
seen Dec 11 at 15:19

I am a researcher at Incipit, where I read, write, think, have coffee and also write code every now and then.

I have experience in method engineering, software methodologies, conceptual modelling, software development techniques, cultural heritage, technical writing and project management.

I'm also a partner in two businesses where we develop large software applications and services, and I participate in standardisation projects with ISO and AENOR.

You can also find me on LinkedIn and I keep a couple of blogs.


Mar
6
answered Translation of “first time doing something”
Mar
4
answered Translation of “How far back?” in the context of time
Mar
3
comment Are there other words that can't be written? (like sal-le)
The corresponding verb forms of resalir and sobresalir cannot be written either, since these verbs are conjugated exactly like salir. This is too evident, so I just thought I'd make a comment rather than write it up as an answer.
Mar
2
comment Matutino and Vespertino
It is vespertino rather than verspertino.
Mar
2
comment Matutino and Vespertino
It is vespertino rather than verspertino.
Mar
2
revised Connotations of “mortal” (slang)
added 155 characters in body
Mar
2
comment Connotations of “mortal” (slang)
@Laura: Indeed.
Mar
1
comment Connotations of “mortal” (slang)
Not in Spain, where it is exactly the opposite. Please qualify your answer for the sake of clarity.
Mar
1
answered Connotations of “mortal” (slang)
Feb
28
comment How do you say “I'm gonna get you!”?
I don't dispute that. But, as an idiom, I'd never use that, and I never hear that, in the context described by the OP. I understand and am able to use the verb "atrapar", but it sounds terribly poetic for everyday speech, and I bet this is extensive to the average Spaniard. Hence my complain about your claim for neutrality and the lack of a regional qualifier.
Feb
28
comment “Te va (a) encantar” - is “a” necessary?
@hippietrail: It is grammatical indeed in Galician. "Vaiche encantar" ("te va a encantar") means literally "te va encantar", without the "a".
Feb
28
comment How do you say “I'm gonna get you!”?
Neutral, meaning what? I'd never say, and I never hear, "¡te atraparé!" in Spain. I think it's good if we add a note about where our answers apply (as far as we know) for the sake of reference, as @MikMik has done on this same page.
Feb
28
comment What is English translation of this short audio file in Spanish ?
One could also note that the speaker speaks poor Spanish; she says "Estoy muy encantada conocerte", where it should be "Estoy muy encantada de conocerte".
Feb
23
answered forever: por siempre vs. para siempre
Feb
23
comment Why is 'estoy' used when saying “I'm related to”
It's more complex than that. Es mi mujer but está casada conmigo; they describe the same relationship using different verbs.
Feb
21
comment How formal is cuán? What are the informal alternatives?
"Cuán grande es..." sounds unusual (too literary, almost poetic) but definitely correct to me. I am a native from Galicia, northwest Spain.
Feb
20
answered Translating “wise” (not referring to a person, e.g. “wise decision”)
Feb
18
comment Why is 'estoy' used when saying “I'm related to”
Don't forget that it is estar emparentado but soy pariente; same root, different verb. You cannot assume that the difference between ser and estar lies always in permanence vs. transience.
Feb
15
comment Convention for group-recited, gender-specific, self-referencing pronouns
Politicians especially, in these times of political correctness, very often use the adage "nosotros y nosotras", or "ciudadanos y ciudadanas", in order to look aware of gender issues and therefore appeal to a larger audience. Whether or not this makes grammatical sense, I am not judging.
Feb
13
revised Origin of 'r' in 'rencontrar'
Fixed Spanish spelling.