2,535 reputation
416
bio website about.me/cesargon
location Galicia, Spain
age 46
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen May 18 at 0:07

I am a researcher at Incipit, where I read, write, think, have coffee and also write code every now and then.

I have experience in method engineering, software methodologies, conceptual modelling, software development techniques, cultural heritage, technical writing and project management.

I'm also a partner in two businesses where we develop large software applications and services, and I participate in standardisation projects with ISO and AENOR.

You can also find me on LinkedIn and I keep a couple of blogs.


Sep
8
reviewed Reject suggested edit on Translation of “Take ___ for granted”
Sep
4
comment Does the word “muestrear” exist?
Check the DRAE. :-)
Aug
20
comment Translation of “llevar a cabo”
Your Rome sentence is hard to assess without putting it in context, but it sounds awkward. Something like "Sucedió la destrucción de Roma" or "Ocurrió la destrucción de Roma" sounds much more idiomatic in Spanish, since you just want to describe that something happened without emphasising a particular agent. "Llevar a cabo" puts the focus on the agent.
Aug
19
comment Translation of “llevar a cabo”
-1 Quite the opposite. "Llevar a cabo" denotes a strong sense of agency that certainly implies that someone needs to carry out the task. The impersonal "se" in your last sentence is good proof that you can't escape the agent.
Aug
6
comment Standalone Gerunds in Phrases
@neizan: Really? That's interesting indeed. I had no idea of that construction in English. Thank you!
Aug
6
comment Standalone Gerunds in Phrases
@neizan: (Yes, I am a Spanish native speaker). I have seen the article plus infinitive construction in Spanish but in a different kind of phrase. For example, you would say "El acostarse tan tarde se va a acabar." (Going to bed so late needs to stop). However, you would say "Acostarse tan tarde es malo para tu salud." (Going to bed so late is bad for your health." Don't ask me why. It may be related to the reflexive "se" in the first case.
Aug
5
comment Standalone Gerunds in Phrases
I'd say "Comer chuches antes de cenar no es bueno", without "El". It sounds much more idiomatic.
Jul
31
reviewed Approve suggested edit on What is the significance of the gender of a noun in Spanish?
Jul
18
awarded  Organizer
Jul
18
revised ¿Por qué razón en España suelen pronunciar los extranjerismos de acuerdo a las reglas del español y no a las reglas del idioma original?
Añadida tag de extranjerismos.
Jul
18
revised Pronunciation of Boca Juniors
Ajustado el título para que coincida con el cuerpo de las pregunta. Ajustadas las tags también.
Jul
16
reviewed Approve suggested edit on “Se te debería ir” vs. “Debería írsete”
Jul
12
comment “Sketchy” in Spanish
By "perro y fluta" I imagine you actually mean "perroflauta": forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1675087
Jul
12
revised How do you say “carpet” in Mexican Spanish?
Reworded so that answer explicitly refers to Mexican Spanish, as per OP and author's comments
Jul
7
comment Pronouncing a person's name according to our mood
Not really. "-ote" in "Carlote" is not a diminutive but an augmentative. And other variations are often built that are not related to diminutive or augmentative functions at all.
Jul
7
comment Pronouncing a person's name according to our mood
Bit this is true of all the languages I know, including English. I can address my friend Charles as Charlie, Charlie-o or Charski (long story here) depending on the situation and mood. This is not a Spanish thing.
Jul
4
revised “You are welcome” in Spanish
edited body
Apr
16
reviewed Approve suggested edit on ¿Cuáles son las distinciones más importantes del castellano amazónico del Perú?
Apr
16
reviewed Approve suggested edit on ¿Cuáles son las distinciones más importantes del castellano amazónico del Perú?
Apr
9
revised Remind me to give it to you
Added accents.