2,555 reputation
417
bio website about.me/cesargon
location Galicia, Spain
age 47
visits member for 2 years, 10 months
seen May 18 at 0:07

I am a researcher at Incipit, where I read, write, think, have coffee and also write code every now and then.

I have experience in method engineering, software methodologies, conceptual modelling, software development techniques, cultural heritage, technical writing and project management.

I'm also a partner in two businesses where we develop large software applications and services, and I participate in standardisation projects with ISO and AENOR.

You can also find me on LinkedIn and I keep a couple of blogs.


Feb
2
suggested suggested edit on “It was great to see you”
Feb
2
answered Translating “to wind up (doing something)”
Jan
30
comment Translation of 'verbose'
@leonbloy: Yes, indeed.
Jan
30
answered Translation of “a simple vista”
Jan
30
comment Translation of “desarrollo integral”
@Joze: I think it should be "all-inclusive", with the hyphen.
Jan
30
answered Translation of “desarrollo integral”
Jan
30
answered Translation of “en cierta medida”
Jan
30
comment Translating “actually” (as in a change of mind)
@Joze: Thank you.
Jan
29
comment Approximant vs. fricative realization of /b/, /d/, /g/
@jrdioko: You have posted 179 questions on this site but you only have a 51% accept rate. Maybe accepting a few answers would encourage others to help you further.
Jan
28
comment Translating “actually” (as in a change of mind)
@Joze: Maybe I wasn't clear enough. The definitions I am quoting from DRAE are for "de hecho", including "de".
Jan
28
answered Translation of 'verbose'
Jan
27
comment Translating “actually” (as in a change of mind)
@Joze: Actually, I do :-) DRAE defines "de hecho" (under "hecho") as "efectivamente" or "con eficacia y buena voluntad", i.e. "truly" or "with efficacy and good will". That's what it means. I am aware that people also use it as a rough equivalent to "pensándolo bien" (i.e. "actually" in English as per the OP), but that is not recognised by DRAE. With regard to the dictionary that you linked to, I find it a bit imprecise: its translations for "de hecho" include terms as disparate as "actually", "as it happened" and "in effect". That might reflect actual language usage, but DRAE disagrees.
Jan
26
comment Translating “actually” (as in a change of mind)
-1 "De hecho" is often used in this context, but it is wrong. "De hecho" means "in fact" or "indeed", but not "actually" as in the OP.
Jan
26
answered Translating “They don't call me … for nothing.”
Jan
25
comment Querer vs Amar & Adorar
@Icarus: If you are speaking colloquially, then "amar" would convey a stronger feeling than "querer", definitely. If, on the contrary, you were writing a piece of literature, than I'd say they are equivalent. What's more, in this case you probably wouldn't use "querer" at all but "amar" all the time.
Jan
25
answered Translation of “settling in”
Jan
25
comment Translation of “settling in”
I don't think that's what "settle in" means in the context of the OP. Please see my answer.
Jan
25
comment “Fall in love with” (non-romantic)
@Brian: I strongly disagree; Spanish also has a rich and subtle vocabulary in this semantic field. In fact, I can find a number of ways to translate "cute" into Spanish without recurring to diminutive suffixes. "Mono" is probably be the most usual translation in the region of Spain where I live.
Jan
25
answered Querer vs Amar & Adorar
Jan
23
revised Translation of “bed bug” (chinche?)
added 44 characters in body