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Feb
3
comment Translating “to wind up (doing something)”
I disagree that "terminar" is more common and/or natural. It might be so in certain regions, but not throughout the Hispanosphere. When making this kind of statement, I think it's good to qualify it with the region you are applying it to, like I did in my own answer.
Feb
2
revised “It was great to see you”
Clarified ambiguous line by splitting it in two
Feb
2
suggested approved edit on “It was great to see you”
Feb
2
answered Translating “to wind up (doing something)”
Jan
30
comment Translation of 'verbose'
@leonbloy: Yes, indeed.
Jan
30
answered Translation of “a simple vista”
Jan
30
comment Translation of “desarrollo integral”
@Joze: I think it should be "all-inclusive", with the hyphen.
Jan
30
answered Translation of “desarrollo integral”
Jan
30
answered Translation of “en cierta medida”
Jan
30
comment Translating “actually” (as in a change of mind)
@Joze: Thank you.
Jan
28
comment Translating “actually” (as in a change of mind)
@Joze: Maybe I wasn't clear enough. The definitions I am quoting from DRAE are for "de hecho", including "de".
Jan
28
answered Translation of 'verbose'
Jan
27
comment Translating “actually” (as in a change of mind)
@Joze: Actually, I do :-) DRAE defines "de hecho" (under "hecho") as "efectivamente" or "con eficacia y buena voluntad", i.e. "truly" or "with efficacy and good will". That's what it means. I am aware that people also use it as a rough equivalent to "pensándolo bien" (i.e. "actually" in English as per the OP), but that is not recognised by DRAE. With regard to the dictionary that you linked to, I find it a bit imprecise: its translations for "de hecho" include terms as disparate as "actually", "as it happened" and "in effect". That might reflect actual language usage, but DRAE disagrees.
Jan
26
comment Translating “actually” (as in a change of mind)
-1 "De hecho" is often used in this context, but it is wrong. "De hecho" means "in fact" or "indeed", but not "actually" as in the OP.
Jan
26
answered Translating “They don't call me … for nothing.”
Jan
25
comment Querer vs Amar & Adorar
@Icarus: If you are speaking colloquially, then "amar" would convey a stronger feeling than "querer", definitely. If, on the contrary, you were writing a piece of literature, than I'd say they are equivalent. What's more, in this case you probably wouldn't use "querer" at all but "amar" all the time.
Jan
25
answered Translation of “settling in”
Jan
25
comment Translation of “settling in”
I don't think that's what "settle in" means in the context of the OP. Please see my answer.
Jan
25
comment “Fall in love with” (non-romantic)
@Brian: I strongly disagree; Spanish also has a rich and subtle vocabulary in this semantic field. In fact, I can find a number of ways to translate "cute" into Spanish without recurring to diminutive suffixes. "Mono" is probably be the most usual translation in the region of Spain where I live.
Jan
25
answered Querer vs Amar & Adorar