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Oct
1
comment Object pronoun placement preferences
In general, you use them indistinctly. I think it may be more related to regionalisms and how you are used to say it. But I read it one by one and it sounded like something I could say anytime.
Sep
17
comment ¿Cuál es origen de la expresión “¡qué pasada!”?
@AlexBcn de acuerdo también. Creo que es una de esas expresiones que no tiene una explicación muy compleja. Si escribes una respuesta con ese argumento, lo daría por bueno ;)
Sep
17
comment How exactly is the letter “s” pronounced in Spain when NOT lisped?
I agree with OP that the answer of the mentioned question is not really answering it. And I also agree with @guifa that his answer (at least the first paragraph) relates to this question. It is a good explanation of the Spanish 's' sound.
Feb
10
awarded  Yearling
Oct
16
awarded  Scholar
Oct
16
comment Análisis sentimental
De mucha ayuda. Mil gracias :)
Oct
16
accepted Análisis sentimental
Oct
13
awarded  Student
Oct
13
asked Análisis sentimental
Aug
27
awarded  Necromancer
Apr
9
answered Por and Para origins
Apr
4
comment Ser vs estar in this sentence
I just answered your other question, which is related to the debería and deber question. Check it and if you still do not understand, just ask ;)
Apr
4
answered Hay que vs tener que vs deber
Apr
4
revised Ser vs estar in this sentence
added 388 characters in body
Apr
4
answered Ser vs estar in this sentence
Apr
3
comment Too big for him
@AmitSchandillia As I said in the previous comment, it depends on the role of demasiado in the sentence. In this case is an adverb (a Complemento Circunstancial de Cantidad), and adverbs do not need an agreement of gender and number with the noun, because they don't modify the noun. E.g.: Esas brocas son **demasiado** grandes para esa pared. In the other hand, demasiada, demasiados and demasiadas are adjectives, which have to be in the same gender and number as the noun, they modify the noun. E.g.: Esa mujer tiene **demasiadas** brocas.
Apr
2
revised Too big for him
demasiado, not demasiada
Apr
2
comment Too big for him
As I edited @fedorqui answer, it should be demasiado, not demasiada. This is because here it works as an adverb not an adjective.
Apr
2
suggested approved edit on Too big for him
Mar
26
answered Melómano y cinéfilo ¿Por qué se forman con sufijos diferentes?