130 reputation
8
bio website joragupra.com
location Berlin, Germany
age 33
visits member for 8 months
seen Aug 13 at 9:03

I'm a software engineer and agile practitioner. After working for an IT consulting firm for more than 6 years I moved to Berlin and joined an exciting start-up.

My primary programming language is Java but I also like Python and Ruby. Currently I'm getting more and more involved with functional programming and I start loving Scala.

My current position is Software Architect. I also work as a Scrum Master in some projects.


Feb
27
comment Millones y Millonas
Cierto para todos los ejemplos que dices pero cuidado porque alguien podría confundirse con el último ejemplo que das. "Ellas son cientos" es correcto. Pero también lo es "Ellas son trescientas trabajadoras", por poner un ejemplo. Por lo que, en general, no es cierto que para cantidades numéricas siempre se use el masculino.
Jan
13
revised Translation of “gesture driven” in mobile app context
better title
Jan
13
suggested suggested edit on Translation of “gesture driven” in mobile app context
Jan
10
awarded  Citizen Patrol
Jan
10
comment Difference between “muy” and “tan”?
@c.p. For me it is better always regardless the context but I didn't know if in Latin America lejos desde was used. That's why I didn't want to sound dogmatic.
Jan
10
revised Difference between “muy” and “tan”?
title improved
Jan
10
comment Difference between “muy” and “tan”?
This is not an answer (I think the question has been answered very well already) but maybe could help you improve too. In your first example, it sound better (at least for a speaker from Spain) to say: "La ciudad de Naga no está tan lejos de aquí". I mean, use lejos de instead of lejos desde.
Jan
9
suggested suggested edit on Difference between “muy” and “tan”?
Jan
9
comment How do I say 'I end up' in Spanish?
@SysDragon I apologize as I did not intend to sound rude, it was just my personal opinion. But of course your answer is totally OK.
Jan
9
comment How do I say 'I end up' in Spanish?
@SysDragon Thanks for the information about your experience speaking Spanish but I think that does not bring anything to the table. Of course, you can use generic verbs like coger or hacer for almost everything but that wouldn't show an extensive vocabulary, don't you think?
Jan
9
awarded  Supporter
Jan
9
comment How do I say 'I end up' in Spanish?
@SysDragon No, it isn't, there are much better words for that, not to mention the meaning coger has for Latin American speakers. And pillar is just a horrible slang expresion.
Jan
8
revised Concordancia entre sujeto y verbo en una frase subordinada
ortography fixing
Jan
8
suggested suggested edit on Concordancia entre sujeto y verbo en una frase subordinada
Jan
8
awarded  Critic
Jan
8
comment How do I say 'I end up' in Spanish?
I think "coger" would not be the first option for a native speaker from Spain in this case.
Jan
8
awarded  Custodian
Jan
8
awarded  Excavator
Jan
8
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Is it an insult to call someone 'cabrón'?
Jan
8
awarded  Editor