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Apr
26
comment How to say “Play!”
You should check "El libro del español correcto" by Instituto Cervantes. These usages of infinitive are covered by pages 60 and 259. Infinitive should be used instead of imperative only for general negative orders ("Do not smoke"->"No fumar"), and subjuntive instead of imperative for particular negative orders ("You, do not smoke"->"No fuméis"). I repeat: something being COMMON does not implie it is CORRECT. Please also check what RAE itself says: rae.es/consultas/infinitivo-por-imperativo
Apr
26
comment How to say “Play!”
@guifa The fact that something is common doesn't mean that it is correct. The translation being usually in infinitive is an error, albeit usual.
Apr
21
answered How to say “Play!”
Apr
4
revised What is the difference between frijoles and habichuelas?
Previous edit deviates from the original intent of the post. Author (me) is spanish and talks mainly about usage in Spain.
Apr
1
revised ¿Se dice “me alegro que” o “me alegro de que”?
El título no expresaba dos opciones contrapuestas
Mar
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
1
answered ¿En la mañana o en las mañanas?
Feb
1
comment The Origin of Vale for OK
This is about another "vale" word. vale1 from 'valere' like "farewell" is not the same as vale2 from 'valer' like "voucher". Not even vale3 used in Dominican Republic. Just check DRAE at dle.rae.es/?id=bHhdVQk|bHhmzcU|bHjoyrZ
Nov
26
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
18
awarded  Yearling
Aug
28
answered Triste y alegre a la vez
Aug
28
comment ¿Se pueden distinguir las patatas fritas en español?
@fedorqui conviértelo en respuesta. Es que lo es.
Aug
28
answered What is the proper translation for 'Dunnage', from English
Jul
6
awarded  Notable Question
Dec
1
comment Spanish for “breasts”
While this usage of "Seno" is teh most correct, the word is also usually used for each breast individually, thus saying at the same time that a woman has one "seno" and that she has two "senos".
Dec
1
comment Spanish for “breasts”
Note that "Busto" has no female meaning. In fact, it refers to the part of the body above the stomach. Thus, sculptures (usually of notable men) that show only head, shoulders and chest are called "Busto", which is the primary meaning of the word.
Dec
1
revised What is the symbol “&” called in Spanish?
Fix broken link, as the page has been moved
Nov
18
awarded  Yearling
Nov
14
answered Concordancia de género en el plural con adjetivos disyunctivos
Nov
14
comment Concordancia de género en el plural con adjetivos disyunctivos
+1 sólo por lo de odiar la arroba. Te pondría otro por el resto de la respuesta. Como nota: no se utiliza el masculino para referirse a conjuntos formados por ambos sexos. Para eso se utiliza el neutro, que tiene la misma forma que el masculino (herencia del latín).