1,348 reputation
318
bio website facebook.com/amitsch666
location India
age 33
visits member for 1 year, 2 months
seen yesterday


Dec
25
revised Bangs/inverted exclamation marks (¡) and queries/inverted question marks (¿) within a sentence
edited title
Dec
25
accepted Bangs/inverted exclamation marks (¡) and queries/inverted question marks (¿) within a sentence
Dec
25
revised Bangs/inverted exclamation marks (¡) and queries/inverted question marks (¿) within a sentence
added 227 characters in body
Dec
25
asked Bangs/inverted exclamation marks (¡) and queries/inverted question marks (¿) within a sentence
Dec
25
asked Object pronouns with the subjunctive
Dec
24
accepted Is this a subjunctive situation?
Dec
23
asked Is this a subjunctive situation?
Dec
22
comment Ring: “anillo” vs “sortija”
I wasn't asking for mere definitions. I "knew" the definitions...was just asking for the "differences" between the terms which appear to have similar definitions according to the dictionaries. But like I said, feel free to use your authority the way you feel like. Thanks.
Dec
22
comment Ring: “anillo” vs “sortija”
Looks like any question pertaining to "Spanish vocabulary" is off topic then since dictionaries address vocabulary. And all "Spanish grammar" questions are off topic since grammar books address...well...grammar. You have the authority so feel free to use it the way you feel like. I have the answer I needed so I don't mind what you do with it now. I don't think my question is off-topic but that doesn't matter since you're the one with the authority. :)
Dec
22
comment “Home” in a non-literal sense
I should have been clearer when I said non-literal. I know the difference in nuances between house, apartment, condo, villa, etc. and that's not what I was referring to. Let me illustrate with another example: "Palestine is my home and I'll die in it." Would you still use casa in this context?
Dec
22
accepted “Home” in a non-literal sense
Dec
22
asked “Home” in a non-literal sense
Dec
21
asked “Just do it” in Spanish
Dec
21
comment Two que's in a single sentence
Thanks for the explanation, Rodrigo. Another related question if you don't mind: Why is it "a" and not "de" after "la vida"?
Dec
21
accepted Two que's in a single sentence
Dec
21
asked Two que's in a single sentence
Dec
21
reviewed Reject Are there cases when I can mute last s?
Dec
20
accepted “Para” in two different contexts within a single sentence
Dec
20
accepted Preterite vs. imperfect and “ser” vs. “estar” to describe a natural condition in the past
Dec
20
comment Preterite vs. imperfect and “ser” vs. “estar” to describe a natural condition in the past
What if "it was dark" is a sentence by itself? I mean, what if I don't add any additional info such as "John Doe arrived at the door", etc.?