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Jun
4
comment How come the subject is omitted in Spanish?
@Aprendedor I am not sure if I understand you. What do you mean here by subject? The grammatical subject as I refer to in my question. In that case, there's no difference between German and Spanish. I mean in both languages they are distinct. With one exception in German ("sie"). Or was it a typo and you wanted to say verb form (conjugation)? But then there is ambiguity in both languages. For instance, Spanish "yo/él estaba", German "wir/sie sind".
Mar
11
comment Is there a difference between como and cómo?
@user3510079 I think what Diego wanted to say that they get an accent mark when the meaning is in an interrogative sense and not that when they have an accent they get the interrogative meaning. Do you see the difference? "because of interrogative sense -> apply accent mark" as opposed to "because of an accent mark -> apply interrogative meaning" But if you're more comfortable with the other view, stick to it.
Mar
10
comment Is there a difference between como and cómo?
It says more than that: "how (in this way) = como" and "how (in which way?) = cómo"
Mar
10
comment Is there a difference between como and cómo?
You didn't look the words up in a dictionary, did you? Here's a link to a bilingual dictionary that will answer your question.
Jan
23
comment Why would you ever say “el vino está delicioso”?
Well, I really don't struggle with "el té está caliente" or "el pelo es blanco" (or "está" when dyed). They are absolutely comprehensible. I can follow the reasoning regarding "muerto". I didn't know that. Thanks for the link. However, still not sure I get the point regarding the vine-example. Concluding from your recap, would you say "El vino es delicioso -> Vine (in general) is delicious" and "El vino está delicioso -> The(=This) vine is delicious"?
Jan
23
comment Why would you ever say “el vino está delicioso”?
Diego, in that situation I perfectly understand the use of "está". – @MikMik With "este vino" I referred to Diego's post, not to the flashcard. In my opinion, the flashcard should read "The vine is delicious - El vino es delicioso". And the question that raised: Why is that not the case?
Jan
23
comment Why would you ever say “el vino está delicioso”?
I understand your reasoning in the last paragraph, but couldn't you simply say "esto vino es delicioso" to have the same differentiation?
Oct
18
comment What is the “dativo ético”?
@clinch I agree. In my native language this is very informal, too, and afaik also only used in a few dialects.
Oct
1
comment ¿Cómo se dice «best way»?
Welcome. FYI: you cannot send a message anyway. It doesn't matter how long you've been part of the community. What you will be able to do is suggesting edits (I don't know how much, if any, rep is necessary though). I did this now, so once the suggestions are accepted, the question contains your improvements and your answer is reduced to the essential part.
Sep
23
comment “Just” in Spanish
Isn't "no tengo ni idea" a straightforward translation for "I have no idea". I don't see how this conveys any further emphasis as "No sé" and "I don't know", respectively.
Aug
23
comment definite article - and the use of “al”
For the same reason as in the other sentence. "jugar a algo"
Aug
7
comment Why do Spanish words have gender?
Since you're talking about German, I'd like to mention that there's another feature. Because German has grammatical cases, you can swap subject and object and the sentence is still the same. Try it in English and you fail: "The man bites the dog - Den Mann beißt der Hund"
Aug
7
comment Are there consistent rules for pronouncing “c” and “g”?
@MichaelWolf What are seseo and ceceo speakers?
Jul
25
comment Are there consistent rules for pronouncing “c” and “g”?
@guifa Thanks for clarification. Fixed it accordingly.
Jul
25
comment Are there consistent rules for pronouncing “c” and “g”?
@guifa So, it's [ˈgera] and [giˈtara]? Did I get that right?
Jun
10
comment Are there consistent rules for pronouncing “c” and “g”?
I'm neither a native speaker nor expert in the studies of pronunciation. I just summarized what I learned and gathered further information to provide IPA. It might still be incomplete or even flawed, so at all native speakers: let me know of any issues so that I can fix it.
Jun
6
comment Are there consistent rules for pronouncing “c” and “g”?
I'm sorry but all those gah, gey, ghea, hee, ... are totally confusing. Even knowing the rules, I don't really understand your answer. Why don't try something like "When C is followed by A, O or U, it's /k/[correct IPA-I don't know it] as in [English example word here with very similar or identical pronunciation]." Put this four times (C+I,E;G+A,O,U;G+I,E), add the 'exceptions'. Eventually, give Spanish examples. "Cocina", eg, has both pronunciations.
May
26
comment What is the difference between “es” and “está”?
My bad. Thank you guys for the hint.
Apr
15
comment ¿“No existe nadie” o “no existe alguien”?
Strictly speaking, Spanish has the "double negatives"; though they're different to what you are referring to. In my mother-tongue(German), we would plainly say "existe nadie". Adding "no" (i.e. no existe nadie) again would reverse the meaning. In that sense, Spanish clearly has a "double negative".
Apr
7
comment Por vs. para vs. a vs. de
I have serious reservations about saying that "para is usually a pretty direct translation of for" as there are many exceptions – in both directions. In fact, prepositions are considered as one of the most difficult things when learning a language.