387 reputation
214
bio website n/a
location Germany
age 29
visits member for 1 year
seen 2 hours ago

I am a software engineer who is interested in improving his languages skills :)


Aug
23
comment definite article - and the use of “al”
For the same reason as in the other sentence. "jugar a algo"
Aug
7
comment Why do Spanish words have gender?
Since you're talking about German, I'd like to mention that there's another feature. Because German has grammatical cases, you can swap subject and object and the sentence is still the same. Try it in English and you fail: "The man bites the dog - Den Mann beißt der Hund"
Aug
7
comment Are there consistent rules for pronouncing “c” and “g”?
@MichaelWolf What are seseo and ceceo speakers?
Jul
25
comment Are there consistent rules for pronouncing “c” and “g”?
@guifa Thanks for clarification. Fixed it accordingly.
Jul
25
comment Are there consistent rules for pronouncing “c” and “g”?
@guifa So, it's [ˈgera] and [giˈtara]? Did I get that right?
Jun
10
comment Are there consistent rules for pronouncing “c” and “g”?
I'm neither a native speaker nor expert in the studies of pronunciation. I just summarized what I learned and gathered further information to provide IPA. It might still be incomplete or even flawed, so at all native speakers: let me know of any issues so that I can fix it.
Jun
6
comment Are there consistent rules for pronouncing “c” and “g”?
I'm sorry but all those gah, gey, ghea, hee, ... are totally confusing. Even knowing the rules, I don't really understand your answer. Why don't try something like "When C is followed by A, O or U, it's /k/[correct IPA-I don't know it] as in [English example word here with very similar or identical pronunciation]." Put this four times (C+I,E;G+A,O,U;G+I,E), add the 'exceptions'. Eventually, give Spanish examples. "Cocina", eg, has both pronunciations.
May
26
comment What is the difference between “es” and “está”?
My bad. Thank you guys for the hint.
Apr
15
comment ¿“No existe nadie” o “no existe alguien”?
Strictly speaking, Spanish has the "double negatives"; though they're different to what you are referring to. In my mother-tongue(German), we would plainly say "existe nadie". Adding "no" (i.e. no existe nadie) again would reverse the meaning. In that sense, Spanish clearly has a "double negative".
Apr
7
comment Por vs. para vs. a vs. de
I have serious reservations about saying that "para is usually a pretty direct translation of for" as there are many exceptions – in both directions. In fact, prepositions are considered as one of the most difficult things when learning a language.
Jan
6
comment How to hispanizise (rather unknown) German toponyms with umlaut?
Well, actually, I can't say if there's a convention in Spanish. I only know how I handle such a thing. Whenever I travel, I try to pronounce the places I visit as natives do. I will fail to pronounce them perfectly but I'm often close to. And when talking about villages in my home, I simply call them exactly as they are. There are just a few exceptions, like Munich, Berlin, Cologne, i.e. the biggest/famous cities.
Jan
6
comment How to hispanizise (rather unknown) German toponyms with umlaut?
I assume it's a pretty tough challenge for Spanish speakers to "pronounce it in German", especially a sound that does not exist in their tongue. – However, I guess that it's the most favorable approach. Try to pronounce it, do your best ;)
Dec
28
comment Difference and usage on “teléfono” and “telefónica”
I guess if my dictionary provides "el telefónico" this is a substantive derived from the adjective?
Dec
27
comment How come the subject is omitted in Spanish?
@c.p. Correct me if I'm wrong. But in "как тебя зовут" тебя is the pronoun but what they often drop is the verb to be as in "вы очень красивый" (oups, don't know how to inflect, Krasivaja I guess^^).
Dec
10
comment What is the difference between “añadir” and “exagerar”?
@leonbloy Coming from the English langauge, exaggerate means that you say that something is larger/bigger/... than it actually is. So I guess that's what he intends to say
Dec
10
comment What is the difference between “añadir” and “exagerar”?
@leonbloy What's the problem in understanding what he means: "He always exaggerates the problem when we're working on a project"
Nov
23
comment What is dative ético?
@wbyoung I'm afraid I cannot offer an appropriate example yet (I could make one up (by translating common example of my mother-tongue to Spanish) but I cannot guarantee it being good). I will add examples when I come across some good examples.
Nov
15
comment What's the meaning of “dar” in “dar por supuesto”?
Does "dar" here still have the literal meaning of "to give", i.e. do you say "to give something for granted" or "to give as a fact" or "to give someone as dead", or would you say that this sense of "dar" has nothing to do with the idea of "to give". I wonder because bilingual dictionaries put out a lot of translations for "dar" which do have nothing in common. I'm used to the fact that you mostly can derive from one meaning to another one, sometimes with a subtle shift, sometimes you need to take a great leap; but here it rather seems to be the opposite: to give - to take.
Nov
4
comment Why isn't “good morning” “buenas mañanas”?
What do you mean by "German and English are pretty formal"? And why did English evolved from German and Spanish predominantly?
Oct
29
comment Why is the “Pretérito perfecto simple” also called “Pretérito indefinido”?
I guess there's no translation into English for that link? I just started learning Spanish a week ago and it takes forever to read this.