317 reputation
110
bio website n/a
location Germany
age 28
visits member for 8 months
seen Apr 15 at 14:50

I am a software engineer who is interested in improving his languages skills :)


Apr
15
comment ¿“No existe nadie” o “no existe alguien”?
Strictly speaking, Spanish has the "double negatives"; though they're different to what you are referring to. In my mother-tongue(German), we would plainly say "existe nadie". Adding "no" (i.e. no existe nadie) again would reverse the meaning. In that sense, Spanish clearly has a "double negative".
Apr
7
comment Por vs. para vs. a vs. de
I have serious reservations about saying that "para is usually a pretty direct translation of for" as there are many exceptions – in both directions. In fact, prepositions are considered as one of the most difficult things when learning a language.
Jan
6
comment How to hispanizise (rather unknown) German toponyms with umlaut?
Well, actually, I can't say if there's a convention in Spanish. I only know how I handle such a thing. Whenever I travel, I try to pronounce the places I visit as natives do. I will fail to pronounce them perfectly but I'm often close to. And when talking about villages in my home, I simply call them exactly as they are. There are just a few exceptions, like Munich, Berlin, Cologne, i.e. the biggest/famous cities.
Jan
6
comment How to hispanizise (rather unknown) German toponyms with umlaut?
I assume it's a pretty tough challenge for Spanish speakers to "pronounce it in German", especially a sound that does not exist in their tongue. – However, I guess that it's the most favorable approach. Try to pronounce it, do your best ;)
Dec
28
comment Difference and usage on “teléfono” and “telefónica”
I guess if my dictionary provides "el telefónico" this is a substantive derived from the adjective?
Dec
27
comment How come the subject is omitted in Spanish?
@c.p. Correct me if I'm wrong. But in "как тебя зовут" тебя is the pronoun but what they often drop is the verb to be as in "вы очень красивый" (oups, don't know how to inflect, Krasivaja I guess^^).
Dec
10
comment What is the difference between “añadir” and “exagerar”?
@leonbloy Coming from the English langauge, exaggerate means that you say that something is larger/bigger/... than it actually is. So I guess that's what he intends to say
Dec
10
comment What is the difference between “añadir” and “exagerar”?
@leonbloy What's the problem in understanding what he means: "He always exaggerates the problem when we're working on a project"
Nov
23
comment What is dative ético?
@wbyoung I'm afraid I cannot offer an appropriate example yet (I could make one up (by translating common example of my mother-tongue to Spanish) but I cannot guarantee it being good). I will add examples when I come across some good examples.
Nov
15
comment What's the meaning of “dar” in “dar por supuesto”?
Does "dar" here still have the literal meaning of "to give", i.e. do you say "to give something for granted" or "to give as a fact" or "to give someone as dead", or would you say that this sense of "dar" has nothing to do with the idea of "to give". I wonder because bilingual dictionaries put out a lot of translations for "dar" which do have nothing in common. I'm used to the fact that you mostly can derive from one meaning to another one, sometimes with a subtle shift, sometimes you need to take a great leap; but here it rather seems to be the opposite: to give - to take.
Nov
4
comment Why isn't “good morning” “buenas mañanas”?
What do you mean by "German and English are pretty formal"? And why did English evolved from German and Spanish predominantly?
Oct
29
comment Why is the “Pretérito perfecto simple” also called “Pretérito indefinido”?
I guess there's no translation into English for that link? I just started learning Spanish a week ago and it takes forever to read this.
Oct
28
comment llamar with names
Interesting question. But wouldn't "Se llame Reggie, pero se llame Reg." be ambiguous in any case. Two another meaning that come to my mind are "Call him Reggie, but his name is Reg" and "His name is Reggie, but he gave himself the name Reg". In informal context and using "llames", then at least the second wouldn't be applicable. I'm curious, what the answer will be.
Oct
18
comment Venir vs. Venirse
Out of curiosity: why did you use "para la casa" in three sentence and only in "Vine a casa" the preposition "a". I would have said "a" in any case.
Aug
23
comment Comparing two opposing things
@leonbloy True. In my opinion it's not specific to Spanish. It's even not about languages at all. But this was what I understood when I read the question of a native Spanish speaker. So it makes me wonder, if this is true for Spanish though. From what I can tell now, based on Gorpik's answer and latest clarification to the question on German stackexchange, I seem to realize that Spanish indeed does not handle things differently than German and English do.
Aug
23
comment Comparing two opposing things
I see. This is possible in my mother-tongue as well. And admittedly, in such a clear situation also the most likely answer. +1 for this catch.
Aug
23
comment Comparing two opposing things
@JoulSauron There's no discussion. It was mentioned in a question about the German language. As a native German speaker, I feel the question very weird at first glance and that made up my question here.