Reputation
2,875
Top tag
Next privilege 3,500 Rep.
Protect questions
Badges
2 18
Newest
 Civic Duty
Impact
~44k people reached

Feb
25
comment Traducción sencilla y elegante para “one hit wonder”
@JohnPeters I don't think so. Some classics where written and/or performed by one-hit wonders.
Feb
25
comment Name of the “United States”
The Fundéu article you link has a very good explanation, in my opinion.
Feb
25
comment What is the difference between “Como estas” and Como estás"
Be aware that, according to current ortography rules, writing éstas is no longer recommended. Cases 1. and 2. should be Como estas.
Feb
24
comment Is «verga» a word I should avoid in polite company?
I agree with what you say, but let me give you some advice to improve your answer. In this case where we deal with different registers, it would be appropriate to specify which country you are talking about. And some examples of the non-vulgar use would also be appreciated.
Feb
19
comment Why to add “la” after “viajar”?
Possible duplicate: spanish.stackexchange.com/questions/672
Feb
17
comment Cómo traducir “rendering”
Si la palabra render se termina adaptando al español, se convertirá en rénder; por tanto, es una palabra distinta de la que enlazas. Además, una es un sustantivo y la otra, un verbo que ha caído en desuso. No veo posibilidad de error. Eso sí: según la RAE, tanto renderizar como render deberían escribirse entre comillas o en cursiva, por ser extranjerismos.
Feb
16
comment Which of these expressions is correct? “Debe ser” vs “Debe de ser”
The answer is correct, but "debe + de" would be the construction of choice in this case. Originally, both constructions had different meanings, as Diego explains; but, through time, the use of deber, without preposition, was extended to also cover the meaning of deber de, so the RAE accepted it a few years ago. But using deber + de removes the ambiguity from the sentence. Debe haber sido un accidente might also mean that, once the evidence has been analysed, the only logical conclusion is that this was an accident.
Feb
12
revised What does “parce” mean?
Misspelled word
Feb
12
comment “cursive” and “printed” writing
I'm afraid some commenters are misunderstanding the English word cursive.
Feb
12
comment “Home” in a non-literal sense
There are some places in Spain where the word hogar is in wider use. I have a friend from Asturias who always says mi hogar for what I would say mi casa.
Feb
11
comment When does a “pez” become a “pescado”?
@Flimzy This may depend on the country or area. In Spain, we would always use cerdo for that, not puerco. Though there are a lot of local variations for that word.
Feb
11
comment How to use the different words for “Have”
possible duplicate of What are the differences between "tener" and "haber"?
Feb
8
answered ¿Uso de lo y le por país?
Feb
4
comment Confused over “vacilar”
If it is in the dictionary, it can no longer be considered slang. It is, nevertheless, an informal or colloquial meaning for the word.
Feb
4
comment Difference between “coche” and “carro”
Then, what do you use for car?
Feb
2
reviewed No Action Needed Does the sentence “no podemos esperar más” translate into English as “we cannot wait any longer” and “We cannot hope for more”?
Feb
2
comment “Absuelto” but not absolved
OK, I've added a little explanation on the etymological link between both words.
Feb
2
revised “Absuelto” but not absolved
Add the etymological link between "absuelto" and "absoluto".
Feb
2
answered “Absuelto” but not absolved
Feb
2
comment What is the difference, if any, between “nunca” and “jamás”?
Wow, I thought this would be a pretty straightforward answer, but you've taught a couple of things about these words. By the way, I would differentiate cases 3 and 4 just as you explain.