2,076 reputation
116
bio website gorpik.blogspot.com
location Madrid, Spain
age 48
visits member for 1 year, 3 months
seen 2 days ago
I am a software engineer with quite a lot of experience in C++, both in Unix and Windows platforms. Recently I have started working in C# and .NET.

Sep
10
answered Origen y uso de “buen provecho” en Puerto Rico - Local Use and Meaning
Sep
7
comment ¿Existe alguna traducción adecuada para “Habemos” en inglés?
@Aradnix, ¿puedes enlazarnos algún texto en que se use esa construcción? Literario o de un periódico.
Sep
7
revised “Sloppiness” by a native Spanish speaker?
Incorporate Neo's comment
Sep
7
comment “Sloppiness” by a native Spanish speaker?
@Neo That's true, que is not strictly necessary. I'll update my answer a bit.
Sep
5
comment “Sloppiness” by a native Spanish speaker?
Cómo is not a preposition, but this sentence does not require a preposition at all. I explain this in my own answer.
Sep
5
answered “Sloppiness” by a native Spanish speaker?
Sep
2
comment ¿Cuál es la diferencia entre “formación” y “capacitación”?
Uf, acabo de darme cuenta de que contesto un comentario de hace casi dos años :D
Sep
2
comment ¿Cuál es la diferencia entre “formación” y “capacitación”?
@Juanillo No estoy de acuerdo. Sí se usa para los cursillos que te capacitan para ejercer determinada actividad o profesión. Por ejemplo: un curso de que te permitirta ejercer legalmente como electricista será un curso de capacitación laboral.
Sep
2
reviewed Approve suggested edit on ¿Cuál es la diferencia entre “formación” y “capacitación”?
Sep
2
reviewed Reject suggested edit on ¿Cuáles son sinónimos de “ni fu ni fa”?
Sep
2
comment ¿Por qué dicen “me vi la película”?
Ojo: ese "la come muy bien" puede llevar a importantes equívocos, al menos en España.
Sep
1
reviewed Edit suggested edit on Cómo decir “college dropout”?
Sep
1
revised Cómo decir “college dropout”?
Gender correction
Sep
1
comment What's the position of my tongue when I speak Spanish 'd'?
Well, fricative refers to the articulation mode, not the articulation place. f is both a labiodental and a fricative (also voiceless, if you want to be comprehensive).
Aug
20
comment What's the position of my tongue when I speak Spanish 'd'?
th is not labiodental, but interdental (you stick your tongue between your teeth, and because of that you also touch your lips with it). A labiodental is a consonant where the bottom lip touches the upper teeth, such as f.
Aug
20
comment The word ending “-ita/-ito” and its usage
@Flimzy No wonder, since the word camarera comes from cámara (chamber). So, initially, it meant chamber-maid, but later the meaning was generalised and nowadays it is also used for waitresses and bartenders.
Aug
20
comment The word ending “-ita/-ito” and its usage
@Flimzy OK, I've upvoted you back. By the way, even though it is not used in Spain, I think everybody here would understand ahorita or ahorita mismo, also pinpointing the likely Mexican or Central American origin of the speaker. And we wouldn't say mesera in Spain, we'd say camarera ;)
Aug
20
comment The word ending “-ita/-ito” and its usage
I agreed with your initial answer, but not after the edition. It is not true that adverbs cannot take diminutives. Some of them can (cerquita, prontito), some of them cannot (, más, any adverb ending in -mente).
Aug
19
comment Why is the ampersand retained in this translation?
Even the English name ampersand derives partly from latin (and per se and). Though you are right, @Flimzy, this is not a question for this forum.
Aug
19
reviewed Reject suggested edit on Origin of the name “Jesucristo”