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visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen May 25 at 23:27

May
25
comment Is there a consistent rule for constructing reflexive verbs?
@rsanchez claro, llover puede ser sintácticamente reflexivo, al agregarle se, pero desde el punto de vista semántico no es reflexivo porque no coinciden el objeto y el sujeto, como en golpearse, en donde el sujeto y el objeto son el mismo: por ejemplo una misma persona.
Jun
10
comment I need a Spanish word list for statistical analysis (as complete as possible)
Thanks @hippietrail. I think I did tell what I need it for: "Then I can import it into a database and make some statistical analysis about letter and syllable frequency and in what combinations do they appear, where in the word, etc" How hard I looked? very hard, that's why I resorted here. Making a question here seems harder than explaining why you're entering the USA from Mexico with a bag of cocaine under your clothes.
May
21
comment Spanish abbreviation for the United States of America
Oh you are, LOL. Well, I can tell you in Argentina nobody says or writes USA in a spanish sentence. It's true that some english acronyms are used, mixed with spanish, but certainly not this one.
May
18
comment Spanish abbreviation for the United States of America
@Flimzy: The original poster asked for an acronym in spanish. For an acronym to belong to the spanish language it has to have initials of spanish words. U.S.A. is not spanish language, it's english, and the original poster asked for spanish, and actually the whole site is about spanish.
Mar
11
comment I need a Spanish word list for statistical analysis (as complete as possible)
@Joze: Oh sorry, so should I post this exact same question in linguistics?
Mar
10
comment I need a Spanish word list for statistical analysis (as complete as possible)
Gracias! no entiendo por qué me cerraron la pregunta, si esto no tiene que ver con el lenguaje y su uso, no entiendo.
Feb
19
comment Why, when, and how did vowels E and I get special treatment from consonants like C,G & Q?
I'm talking about pronunciation, maybe the fact that I included the Q makes it look that I'm confusing pronunciation with spelling, but I just included the Q because it's the way in Spanish to make the /k/ sound which the C can't make before E and I.
Feb
19
comment Why, when, and how did vowels E and I get special treatment from consonants like C,G & Q?
Yes, I'm not confusing them, I'm talking about pronunciation, like I wrote in the question.
Feb
18
comment Difference between “está” and “esta” or “esté” and “este”?
Specially the answer to the question is on the sentence that starts with Besides,...
Feb
9
comment Determining gender of words ending in “e”
For the last 4 examples, I would say that the rule is simpler, all those nouns are masculine ( color, número, río, mar, lago ) and thus when naming a specific one of them, they will be also masculine. I'm not sure, but I think it's always like this, except for exceptions :D
Feb
9
comment Translation of the C++ “move constructor” language element
Sorry for the off-topic but I'm into C++ and haven't heard of move-constructors, how is it different from a copy constructor? it deletes the original object or something?
Feb
9
comment Word usage: “caminamos” VS “caminábamos”
@Cadenza: no, caminábamos would be we were walking
Feb
9
comment Word usage: “caminamos” VS “caminábamos”
In the first example, as you start with Así que you are implying in some way that this is the consequence of something, and as such it's supposedly a finished action and not continued, so caminamos would make more sense than caminábamos
Feb
9
comment Word usage: “caminamos” VS “caminábamos”
What alternative do you think of for había? it means there was/there were so it's just fine here.
Jan
24
comment Approximant vs. fricative realization of /b/, /d/, /g/
I would say that it depends a lot on accents. But yes, generally it's like that. I had a greek friend that was astonished to hear "goga-gola" in Argentina, instead of "Coca-cola"
Jan
24
comment Studying Spanish at school in a Spanish speaking country
Where do you live? that results you mention are from private, public education or general? And I have to say, children of 17 years old not knowing well to tell apart nouns, verbs and adjectives? wow.
Jan
14
comment Why is “Enrique” pronunced as though it has a double “r”?
@DiegoMijelshon: Ok, if you state that the majority of the spanish speaking population and the RAE agree on one pronunciation and that 's the wrong pronunciation in the spanish language, then we have nothing else to discuss. I'll finish saying that I agree with you in that foreign proper names, specially countries' names should be pronounced as close as their original pronunciation.
Jan
14
comment Why is “Enrique” pronunced as though it has a double “r”?
@DiegoMijelshon: that happens a lot with many other countries. the q in Iraq is a sound totally strange to Spanish, yet you spell it Irak and pronounce it with an approximate pronunciation in Spanish. I agree with your example of Idish, but with Israel it's not only a rule of the RAE that nobody follows, but it's also the widely used pronunciation. The fact that Jewish people (not all of them) pronounce Israel with a soft r is not only about Spanish phonology but also has to do with a sense of belonging to a peoples* and culture, and I totally respect that. (* pueblo)
Jan
14
comment Why is “Enrique” pronunced as though it has a double “r”?
@Diego: I agree with you, I think proper names should be pronounced as they are in their original languages, but as we are talking about the Spanish language, it has clear rules, and one of them is that r after s becomes hard as rr. (check this post's link to the RAE article, it gives the specific example of israelí)
Jan
11
comment Can I learn to roll my R's?
You're right, but I didn't remember the word "Alveolar ridge" :D. thanks