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location Argentina
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visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen May 25 at 23:27

Feb
18
asked Why, when, and how did vowels E and I get special treatment from consonants like C,G & Q?
Feb
9
comment Determining gender of words ending in “e”
For the last 4 examples, I would say that the rule is simpler, all those nouns are masculine ( color, número, río, mar, lago ) and thus when naming a specific one of them, they will be also masculine. I'm not sure, but I think it's always like this, except for exceptions :D
Feb
9
comment Translation of the C++ “move constructor” language element
Sorry for the off-topic but I'm into C++ and haven't heard of move-constructors, how is it different from a copy constructor? it deletes the original object or something?
Feb
9
comment Word usage: “caminamos” VS “caminábamos”
@Cadenza: no, caminábamos would be we were walking
Feb
9
comment Word usage: “caminamos” VS “caminábamos”
In the first example, as you start with Así que you are implying in some way that this is the consequence of something, and as such it's supposedly a finished action and not continued, so caminamos would make more sense than caminábamos
Feb
9
comment Word usage: “caminamos” VS “caminábamos”
What alternative do you think of for había? it means there was/there were so it's just fine here.
Jan
24
comment Approximant vs. fricative realization of /b/, /d/, /g/
I would say that it depends a lot on accents. But yes, generally it's like that. I had a greek friend that was astonished to hear "goga-gola" in Argentina, instead of "Coca-cola"
Jan
24
comment Studying Spanish at school in a Spanish speaking country
Where do you live? that results you mention are from private, public education or general? And I have to say, children of 17 years old not knowing well to tell apart nouns, verbs and adjectives? wow.
Jan
14
comment Why is “Enrique” pronunced as though it has a double “r”?
@DiegoMijelshon: Ok, if you state that the majority of the spanish speaking population and the RAE agree on one pronunciation and that 's the wrong pronunciation in the spanish language, then we have nothing else to discuss. I'll finish saying that I agree with you in that foreign proper names, specially countries' names should be pronounced as close as their original pronunciation.
Jan
14
comment Why is “Enrique” pronunced as though it has a double “r”?
@DiegoMijelshon: that happens a lot with many other countries. the q in Iraq is a sound totally strange to Spanish, yet you spell it Irak and pronounce it with an approximate pronunciation in Spanish. I agree with your example of Idish, but with Israel it's not only a rule of the RAE that nobody follows, but it's also the widely used pronunciation. The fact that Jewish people (not all of them) pronounce Israel with a soft r is not only about Spanish phonology but also has to do with a sense of belonging to a peoples* and culture, and I totally respect that. (* pueblo)
Jan
14
comment Why is “Enrique” pronunced as though it has a double “r”?
@Diego: I agree with you, I think proper names should be pronounced as they are in their original languages, but as we are talking about the Spanish language, it has clear rules, and one of them is that r after s becomes hard as rr. (check this post's link to the RAE article, it gives the specific example of israelí)
Jan
11
revised Can I learn to roll my R's?
deleted 10 characters in body
Jan
11
comment Can I learn to roll my R's?
You're right, but I didn't remember the word "Alveolar ridge" :D. thanks
Jan
11
comment Why is “Enrique” pronunced as though it has a double “r”?
@DiegoMijelshon: Ok, let's debate :D I'm not familiar with SE's chat, but that's the place for this, I think.
Jan
11
awarded  Revival
Jan
10
comment Why is “Enrique” pronunced as though it has a double “r”?
Nope, no sources, just what I told you
Jan
10
comment What is the difference between 'hallar' and 'encontrar'?
One fix: 'Se las llevó María'
Jan
10
comment Why is “Enrique” pronunced as though it has a double “r”?
Yes, that's right, the dd in Eddy sounds totally different than the single english d, and Eddy is in fact the example given in english when trying to explain the spanish r. It doesn't sound logical, but hey, english is not logical.
Jan
10
comment Names of children's games
Asterisk at the beginning of a line, and then a space.
Jan
10
comment Names of children's games
I've played Simon says simply as Simón dice but it could just be a direct translation. (I comment this answer as I'm from Buenos Aires too)