223 reputation
17
bio website wendikidd.unrealcreations.com
location Dallas, TX
age
visits member for 1 year, 3 months
seen Apr 30 at 1:24

Programmer by profession and passion~


Dec
8
comment Can I remove the first “que” in “un juego que hay que jugar”?
Ohh, I see! That's very insightful. Thank you very much for sharing! +1!
Dec
8
comment Can I remove the first “que” in “un juego que hay que jugar”?
So you do think the first que is necessary, then? If you don't like the one translation, what do you think the version with the comma means?
Oct
29
comment llamar with names
Wow! What an excellent and thought-provoking answer! I learned a lot (even about English! I'd never heard of the middle voice), and I imagine I'll come back through to re-read this several more times. Thank you so much for answering my question! If I could +10 I would ;)
Oct
29
comment llamar with names
No, you didn't confuse me; this actually makes a lot of sense :) I'm still not quite sure how to instruct someone to call you by a certain name, though. Puedes llamarme Ishamel seems to translate as You can call me Ishmael. Which is the polite way to say it, and would work in most circumstances. But what is the idiomatic way to order someone to call you by a certain name? Ex. "You can call me Robert." "Oh, but I want to call you Bob!" "No. Call me Robert."
Oct
16
comment Punctuation with “sino”
@Flimzy Sorry, I didn't consider it an additional question when I asked it, I was hoping for an edit to elaborate on this one! But I see your point and will ask a new question shortly :)
Oct
15
comment Punctuation with “sino”
Hi, thanks for your answer! I read the source, but can you please elaborate on the necessity of que after sino? If I understood the link correctly, when I am talking about my own actions/preferences I must use que. But if I am talking about someone else (ex. Ellos no caminan, sino corran) I don't have to. Is that correct? What significance does the que add? Thanks!
Aug
26
comment What's the correct Spanish word to mean “as” in this context
Thanks for the answer; very insightful! I hadn't considered cuando, but I like the way you've used it here. It sounds right in my head, and seems most similar to the original as :) Thanks! (+1 :))
Aug
26
comment What's the correct Spanish word to mean “as” in this context
Thanks again for the helpful answer! :) I understand all the other examples, but with is the difference between using mientras by itself vs. mientras que? Thank you!
Aug
26
comment ¿“Los auriculares” o “el auriculares”?
Thank you very much! Your corrections make sense, I appreciate them :) About los auriuculares vs el auricular, though... Does that mean that for one pair of headphones, that's el auricular (or el audifono)? And los auriculares means multiple pairs of headphones? (I was confused on this one because in English, headphones is both singular and plural. "Those are nice headphones." (1 set) "I bought a lot of headphones today." (more than 1 set)
Aug
23
comment “I need to work on…” for a general sentence
Interesting. I always considered en to be like in. But the only other similar word I can think of would be sobre. Not a native Spanish speaker though, so I'm interested to see what others say about this!
Aug
2
comment Subject-Verb Agreement “Estudiar y trabajar resulta…”
@Kage is right; in the English version should use "results". "Studying and working at the same time" is the singular subject of the sentence. "[x] always results in a big challenge."
Jun
26
comment How is the placement of this prepositional phrase grammatical?
I'm a little confused. I read "de paja oro" as "of gold straw" (as in the straw itself is gold). Why does "de oro" modify "nimbaba" instead of "paja"?
Jun
26
comment How do you introduce yourself on the phone?
@JoJo You might equate it to "Joe speaking" which is often used in English. :)