218 reputation
5
bio website wendikidd.unrealcreations.com
location Dallas, TX
age
visits member for 10 months
seen Dec 8 '13 at 20:02

Programmer by profession and passion~


Dec
8
comment Can I remove the first “que” in “un juego que hay que jugar”?
Ohh, I see! That's very insightful. Thank you very much for sharing! +1!
Dec
8
comment Can I remove the first “que” in “un juego que hay que jugar”?
So you do think the first que is necessary, then? If you don't like the one translation, what do you think the version with the comma means?
Dec
4
asked Can I remove the first “que” in “un juego que hay que jugar”?
Oct
30
revised llamar with names
corrected minor typos in this brilliant answer! :)
Oct
29
suggested suggested edit on llamar with names
Oct
29
accepted llamar with names
Oct
29
comment llamar with names
Wow! What an excellent and thought-provoking answer! I learned a lot (even about English! I'd never heard of the middle voice), and I imagine I'll come back through to re-read this several more times. Thank you so much for answering my question! If I could +10 I would ;)
Oct
29
awarded  Commentator
Oct
29
comment llamar with names
No, you didn't confuse me; this actually makes a lot of sense :) I'm still not quite sure how to instruct someone to call you by a certain name, though. Puedes llamarme Ishamel seems to translate as You can call me Ishmael. Which is the polite way to say it, and would work in most circumstances. But what is the idiomatic way to order someone to call you by a certain name? Ex. "You can call me Robert." "Oh, but I want to call you Bob!" "No. Call me Robert."
Oct
29
revised Adjectives that modify more than one noun
improved formatting
Oct
28
suggested suggested edit on Adjectives that modify more than one noun
Oct
28
asked llamar with names
Oct
16
comment Punctuation with “sino”
@Flimzy Sorry, I didn't consider it an additional question when I asked it, I was hoping for an edit to elaborate on this one! But I see your point and will ask a new question shortly :)
Oct
15
comment Punctuation with “sino”
Hi, thanks for your answer! I read the source, but can you please elaborate on the necessity of que after sino? If I understood the link correctly, when I am talking about my own actions/preferences I must use que. But if I am talking about someone else (ex. Ellos no caminan, sino corran) I don't have to. Is that correct? What significance does the que add? Thanks!
Oct
15
asked Punctuation with “sino”
Sep
25
revised Poetic translation for “I'll be your Manolete, if you'll be my Lupe”
improved title and formatting, removed redundancies
Sep
24
suggested suggested edit on Poetic translation for “I'll be your Manolete, if you'll be my Lupe”
Sep
17
revised Does the word “muestrear” exist?
improved formatting
Sep
17
revised What does “Puesto que…” mean?
improved formatting
Sep
17
revised Uso de “en al frente”
improved formatting