153 reputation
6
bio website garthof.es
location Spain
age 32
visits member for 3 years
seen Mar 20 at 14:30

I'm currently working as a researcher for the University of Santiago de Compostela in the medical image segmentation field, using GPGPU with NVIDIA CUDA.

I have a little background as a C# .NET programmer for smart devices and desktop computers.

I've recently discovered Python and fallen in love with it :P


Dec
6
comment What's the “ísimo” in the following words?
As noticed in Gonzalo Medina's answer, it is not calientísimo, but calentísimo.
Nov
30
comment Counterpart of “John Doe, Joe Public”?
And don't forger also about Mengano. Even the diminutive forms are quite common also: Fulanito, Menganito
Nov
30
comment “¿Qué te interesa?” or “¿Qué te interesan?”
The subject in the sentence is qué, a pronoun which is inherently singular, so the verb must be in singular. ¿Qué os interesan? would be grammatically INCORRECT for the very same reason. Correct alternatives would be ¿Qué os interesa? or ¿Qué cosas os interesan? In this last case, qué is no longer a pronoun but an adjective modifying the noun cosas --it should be in its plural form, but the adjective qué is invariant.
Nov
24
comment “Guion” vs “Guión” - Are there other words which could be written in multiple ways?
For the sake of completeness, you could include exégeta or exegeta (you can find the meaning here), which doesn't appear on any list.
Nov
24
comment No supo la respuesta
In your last two sentences, you wrote hombre instead of nombre.
Nov
22
comment Does using “tío” imply a negative opinion?
@hippietrail Not necessarily. Well, I don't understand what do you mean by el señor por allá, that doesn't make much sense to me. An example of using señor could be Estaba paseando por el parque, y un señor me preguntó la hora. If you say, un tío me preguntó la hora, it sounds more disrespectful. Alternatively, you could say instead una persona me preguntó la hora, omitting the fact that the person was probably older than you, and that he was a man. By the way, it is DISculpe.
Nov
22
comment Does using “tío” imply a negative opinion?
@hippietrail Or also señor in some cases, typically used to refer people who are much older than you :)
Nov
22
comment Best translation of “just wanted to”
Thanks for the tip! :)
Nov
22
comment Best translation of “just wanted to”
I didn't know it either! The rule has changed since I studied it when I was a child, but the DPD is clear (buscon.rae.es/dpdI/SrvltGUIBusDPD?lema=tilde2#323): solo (adverb) needs accent when there is some possible ambiguity, which is not the case here. However, as this seems to be a recent change to the rules, you will probably find sólo with accent even in contexts when there is no possible confusion.
Nov
21
comment Best translation of “just wanted to”
I would use sólo/solamente too. I've just noticed a minor typo: Sólo quería saber QUÉ pensabas de esto.
Nov
20
comment When should I use the pure passive voice in Spanish? ( fue/fueron [past participle] )
@hippietrail Sure! But as I've said, although both have the same meaning, La propuesta fue aceptada would be more common in formal texts (let's say, when you want to write in a more elaborated way).