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visits member for 2 years, 11 months
seen Nov 27 '12 at 22:52

Nov
27
comment ¿Cuál es la diferencia entre “formación” y “capacitación”?
Es España la palabra "capacitación" no se usa al menos de forma habitual, aunque sí se usa en forma de adjetivo: alguien es capaz o alguien está capacitado. Aunque hay alternativas como nombre como "formación", "preparación", "instrucción"... Quizás la diferencia que apuntas en España sería formación / formación técnica.
Jun
29
comment What is the rule for cualquier, cualquiera, and cualesquiera?
you have said it sounds good... I don't really understand why you think it's not going to be the accepted way.
Jun
29
comment Translating “shrewd” (as in “a shrewd businessman”)
Quizás embaucador
Jun
29
comment What is the rule for cualquier, cualquiera, and cualesquiera?
Cualquier semana is completely correct. here RAE explains the use of cualquiera: lema.rae.es/dpd/?key=cualquiera&origen=RAE You can read that before nouns it should be used cualquier instead of cualquiera, though it is also accepted the cualquiera but it's something very unusual except if you're from Chile.
Apr
9
comment No se acumulan vs No están acumulados
"The permissions are not accumulated" is a passive voice as "Los permisos no se acumulan" (pasiva refleja). If you want to keep the meaning you could say too : "Los permisos no son aumulados" (normal passive though it is more normal the previous one).
Mar
18
comment Condescendiente / Condescendant
According to thefreedictionary.com "to condescend" also has 2 different meanings. Maybe the Spanish translation is related to the meaning "To descend to the level of one considered inferior; lower oneself." thefreedictionary.com/condescend
Mar
12
comment Plug vs Socket: Interchangeable?
At least in Spain, both can be called as enchufe. "Toma de corriente" is a more a technical name and non-technician people use "enchufe". As "¿dónde hay un enchufe para conectar el portátil?"
Feb
22
comment Difference between “mas” and “más”
"más" and "mas" is not the same. "Más" is a comparative adverb while "mas" is a adversative conjuction.
Feb
22
comment Difference between “mas” and “más”
It doesn't make any sense comparing "más" and "mas" in the frequency of use. They don't mean the same! It would be like saying that "hello" is more frequent than "helo" in English. You can say that "pero" is much more used than "mas" (they mean the same).
Feb
13
comment When is uppercase used in English but lowercase in Spanish?
though it's correct just point out that the ordinals after the names are 99% of times written like: "Luis XIV" instead of "Luis catorce"
Feb
13
comment When does sólo have an accent?
@Petruza the rule is not outdated (this new rule is just a recommendation but it's not compulsory. At first it was but after a lot of complains about it they made it just a recommendation).
Feb
13
comment When does sólo have an accent?
At First RAE said these new rules where compulsory. After a lot of protests they went back and it's not compulsory so "sólo" is also OK when it means ("solamente"). For that reason the dictionary still keeps both words. They can't change a rule that people uses for such a long time.
Feb
13
comment Convention for group-recited, gender-specific, self-referencing pronouns
I think you mean "estar comprometido con la verdad"
Feb
12
comment Why is sport in Spanish 'deporte' and not 'esporte'?
"especial" also exists in English. I find this question as senseless as "if oranges are called oranges why lemons are not called yellows?"
Feb
10
comment What is the difference between: “aquel” and “aquél”
from RAE: "En este último caso escr. con acento cuando existe riesgo de anfibología." So the accent is not compulsory unless the term can be ambiguous (and it usually is not ambiguous). So "Aquel" can also be a pronoun. buscon.rae.es/draeI/…
Feb
10
comment Ser and estar for location
when you say "está muy lejos" or "está aquí" you're not saying where the event takes place. You're saying how far it is from where you are, so it's not exactly a location but a distance. Anyway, both "el desfile" and "el crucero" can be interpretated as things that are not events: a group of people and a ship.
Feb
8
comment Is there a difference between “español” and “castellano”?
@CesarGon "The term Spanish, to the mind of many people, means imposition, domination, banning of their native vehicle for communication" then following the reasoning the Spanish people must be those who impose, dominate and banned. It just links the term "Spanish" to the dictatorship. Of course wounds are still open because culprits hasn't been judged and victims are still there, but there were also victims in places like Castilla, Andalucía not only in the Basque Country, Galicia or Catalonia. It despises the people from America because you don't take their language into account.
Feb
8
comment Is there a difference between “español” and “castellano”?
@Joze I agree you and but I don't agree CesarGon. The dictatorship imposed the Spanish language, but it finished. It's quite unfair for all the Spanish that the term "Spanish" can be understood just as the language of the supporters of the dictatorship. Spanish existed before the dictatorship and was spoken not only in Castilla but also in the rest of Spain (it doesn't mean that there weren't others). Spanish is just a common language among all Spanish citizens and I don't want that all those supporters of the dictatorship can appropiate on the language. It's not theirs.
Feb
7
comment Translation of “desafuero” to English
"afuera" doesn't have anything to do with "desafuero". "Desafuero" comes from "fuero" which is a type of privilege.
Feb
7
comment Translation of “desafuero” to English
Could you please post the sentence you saw? I'm quite curious to read it.