Reputation
974
Top tag
Next privilege 1,000 Rep.
Edit questions and answers
Badges
5 14
Impact
~24k people reached

Nov
20
awarded  Commentator
Nov
20
comment Use of “Que” in “Que todo te vaya bien”
Ojalá works the same as que here.
Nov
19
awarded  Nice Answer
Nov
19
awarded  Enlightened
Nov
19
revised Matutino and Vespertino
updated tags
Nov
19
asked Matutino and Vespertino
Nov
19
comment Do “alborada”, “amanecer”, and “madrugada” refer to the same thing?
Don't forget la salida del sol and el crepúsculo.
Nov
19
comment Is/Was there a Basic Spanish?
@vartec The missionaries in New Spain invested enormous resources in didactic religious artwork and wrote the largest and most extensive set of dictionaries and grammars ever seen for native languages in the Sixteenth through Eighteenth centuries. It wasn't entirely altruistic but it was a serious effort at education.
Nov
19
comment How to pronounce the consonants “y” and “ll”?
@hippietrail Dictionaries don't have a special section for rr because it never begins a word. Any word that starts with r has the rr pronunciation anyway. Whether it counts as a separate letter (sometimes sí, sometimes no, but the RAE now says it doesn't) is a separate issue.
Nov
19
comment How should I translate “table” (as in a data table)?
This is especially natural usage for any Spanish speaker with a doctorate in Algebra, Statistics, or Physics. (Note: Algebra comes to English from Arabic by way of Spanish.)
Nov
19
answered How should I translate “table” (as in a data table)?
Nov
19
comment 'vos' vs 'tú' usage by country
I've never heard voseo in southeast Guatemala. By reputation, there's at least one belt where it is common between Huehuetenango, Guatemala and Ciudad Cuauhtémoc, Chiapas, México. That's an isolated mountain region that could maintain its own historic diction among the minority that are native Spanish speakers.
Nov
19
comment ¿Cuál es la diferencia entre «también» y «tampoco»?
One does not say, "una otra persona." Just "otra persona" will do; "otro" never takes a definite article.
Nov
19
comment What is the diminutive of “pan” (meaning bread)?
For pansito: Pancita is the diminutive of panza; you wouldn't want to confuse those.
Nov
19
suggested approved edit on Does indirect speech in Spanish require changes in tense, mood, etc?
Nov
19
awarded  Editor
Nov
19
revised Does indirect speech in Spanish require changes in tense, mood, etc?
added coverage of subjunctive issues
Nov
19
awarded  Student
Nov
19
answered Does indirect speech in Spanish require changes in tense, mood, etc?
Nov
19
asked How are «parecer», «semejante», and «similar» used to express sameness?