974 reputation
513
bio website utahbrian.com
location Salt Lake City, UT
age 40
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen Sep 1 at 10:43

I like to write computer programs. I also like backpacking, bike riding, math, natural languages, books, and learning new things.

Utah is the most beautiful place on Earth.

I have ascended characters from every race and class in Nethack.

brian@utahbrian.com


Nov
18
awarded  Yearling
Dec
18
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
18
awarded  Yearling
Nov
18
awarded  Yearling
Mar
26
revised Matutino and Vespertino
fixed pselling on vespertino
Mar
12
awarded  Beta
Dec
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
3
comment How to avoid the lexical redundancy in the literal Spanish translation of “to ask a question”?
I'm just here to add that "question" doesn't always translate as «pregunta»; when you want to discuss an issue or controversy rather than just an interrogative, you need «cuestión». The next time you're discussing the Schleswig-Holstein Question, it's what you want. And Spanish for "ask" is usually «pedir», unless all you want is the answer to a question, so the English equivalent for «preguntar» really requires both "ask" and "question." Oh, and "to question" is «interrogar». It's like a tar pit for anybody who wants to translate word-by-word.
Dec
3
comment Why is Usted sometimes abbreviated as Vd. instead of Ud.? Is there any difference in usage between the two?
"Castellano" describes Spanish contrasted with Portugese, Catalan, Arabic, and Aragonese, the most common tongues in Iberia before dictators Fred and Isabel got hitched, united Spain, and started the Inquisition 1469. "Cristiano" describes Spanish in contrast to Arabic. "Mexica" describes the Nahuatl language spoken by Aztecs that originates in Utah and New Mexico and has 5 million+ speakers in Mexico; it is unrelated to Spanish. Most Mexicans do like Spanish culture and most Americans do like English culture. Mexicans use both "Ud." and "Vd." "Vd." never follows "nosotros" in conjugation.
Dec
2
revised Latin /f/ to Spanish /h/
added examples
Nov
30
answered Why is Usted sometimes abbreviated as Vd. instead of Ud.? Is there any difference in usage between the two?
Nov
30
suggested approved edit on Latin /f/ to Spanish /h/
Nov
30
comment ¿Por qué es la palabra «mano» femenina?
@CesarGon The Oxford Spanish Dictionary says: dinamo m or (Esp) f so apparently feminine dynamos are a usage peculiar to Spain. Nevertheless, Spanish in Spain is natural so it does constitute a natural example beyond mano.
Nov
29
revised Various translations of “ticket”
spellling fix
Nov
29
revised How would you express giving a command to yourself in Spanish?
added 30 characters in body
Nov
29
answered How would you express giving a command to yourself in Spanish?
Nov
29
comment ¿Por qué es la palabra «mano» femenina?
@CesarGon Odd, in Mexico we say, "los dinamos."
Nov
28
comment Why is “Enrique” pronunced as though it has a double “r”?
Also when followed by l, m, n, and s the ere becomes erre.
Nov
28
revised Why don't Spanish words start with “sp”?
deleted 6 characters in body
Nov
28
revised Why don't Spanish words start with “sp”?
added etymological note