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Mar
12
awarded  Popular Question
Jan
21
comment What is Salsa? Which Salsa is which?
In American English, the loanword salsa always means pico de gallo. It's a bit odd as the Mexican speakers who brought the concept almost always mean verde or rojo when they use bare salsa, but Americans who don't speak Spanish don't eat much verde and rojo.
Nov
18
awarded  Yearling
Dec
18
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
18
awarded  Yearling
Nov
18
awarded  Yearling
Mar
26
revised Matutino and Vespertino
fixed pselling on vespertino
Mar
12
awarded  Beta
Dec
4
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
3
comment How to avoid the lexical redundancy in the literal Spanish translation of “to ask a question”?
I'm just here to add that "question" doesn't always translate as «pregunta»; when you want to discuss an issue or controversy rather than just an interrogative, you need «cuestión». The next time you're discussing the Schleswig-Holstein Question, it's what you want. And Spanish for "ask" is usually «pedir», unless all you want is the answer to a question, so the English equivalent for «preguntar» really requires both "ask" and "question." Oh, and "to question" is «interrogar». It's like a tar pit for anybody who wants to translate word-by-word.
Dec
3
comment Why is Usted sometimes abbreviated as Vd. instead of Ud.? Is there any difference in usage between the two?
"Castellano" describes Spanish contrasted with Portugese, Catalan, Arabic, and Aragonese, the most common tongues in Iberia before dictators Fred and Isabel got hitched, united Spain, and started the Inquisition 1469. "Cristiano" describes Spanish in contrast to Arabic. "Mexica" describes the Nahuatl language spoken by Aztecs that originates in Utah and New Mexico and has 5 million+ speakers in Mexico; it is unrelated to Spanish. Most Mexicans do like Spanish culture and most Americans do like English culture. Mexicans use both "Ud." and "Vd." "Vd." never follows "nosotros" in conjugation.
Dec
2
revised Latin /f/ to Spanish /h/
added examples
Nov
30
answered Why is Usted sometimes abbreviated as Vd. instead of Ud.? Is there any difference in usage between the two?
Nov
30
suggested approved edit on Latin /f/ to Spanish /h/
Nov
30
comment ¿Por qué es la palabra «mano» femenina?
@CesarGon The Oxford Spanish Dictionary says: dinamo m or (Esp) f so apparently feminine dynamos are a usage peculiar to Spain. Nevertheless, Spanish in Spain is natural so it does constitute a natural example beyond mano.
Nov
29
revised Various translations of “ticket”
spellling fix
Nov
29
revised How would you express giving a command to yourself in Spanish?
added 30 characters in body
Nov
29
answered How would you express giving a command to yourself in Spanish?
Nov
29
comment ¿Por qué es la palabra «mano» femenina?
@CesarGon Odd, in Mexico we say, "los dinamos."
Nov
28
comment Why is “Enrique” pronunced as though it has a double “r”?
Also when followed by l, m, n, and s the ere becomes erre.