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Jul
10
comment Spanish for “goat”
Have you tried looking them each up in a dictionary? That would be a good first step. chivo, cabra, cordero, carnero, oveja. Once you've done that, if you still have questions about the differences or nuances, that will make for a much better question here.
Jul
10
comment Can sino compare subjects?
A funny transcription, but a good question. :)
Jul
10
comment Why isn't sunrise “Entrada del Sol”?
The sun is "coming out of hiding." We say exactly the same thing in English for the moon: "Oh look, the moon is coming out!" means the moon is appearing--not disappearing.
Jun
26
comment Has “fud” made it into mainstream Spanish as a word for “food?”
As far as I know, fud is just a brand name as @guifa mentioned.
Jun
23
comment Exception to the Phonetic Rule
@JaimeCruzTriana: I have heard güey pronounced both with the hard G, and without it.
Jun
16
comment Exception to the Phonetic Rule
Well, it's not really that rare--at least not in Mexico, where many towns and streets have names which begin with X. And also a "Cs" sound minus "C" is a different pronunciation.
Jun
15
comment Are there consistent rules for pronouncing “c” and “g”?
1) Goat and Gun are not Spanish words, so they don't really apply. 2) You still didn't address ü.
Jun
7
comment How do you say “Turnover” in Spanish?
For words like this, you need to practice translating the concept, not the word.
Jun
7
comment Exception to the Phonetic Rule
X has three pronunciations, you missed the 's/z' sound as in "Xochitl".
Jun
7
comment Are there consistent rules for pronouncing “c” and “g”?
@MichaelWolf: See here about güey. But güey and agua aren't really comparable, since they're different g sounds, and I think guau doesn't really count, since it's not actually a Spanish word, but an Anglicanism, and an attempt to approximate an English word with a Spanish spelling.
Jun
6
comment Learning Spanish
Thank you for improving your question. However, it's still too broad to be a good fit for this site, as it is more of a discussion question than an objective question with a specific answer. There are many ways to learn a foreign language which don't involve vocab and grammar drills, which have varying degrees of usefulness depending on your context and learning goals.
Jun
6
comment Translating a legit double negative
@angus: But feel free to vote to re-open this one.
Jun
6
comment Translating a legit double negative
@angus: I disagree; I think the other answers apply quite reasonably here. I think your answer is also good, and expands upon the previous answers, but would also apply equally well to the other question.
Jun
5
comment Are there consistent rules for pronouncing “c” and “g”?
You forgot Ü.
Jun
5
comment Are there consistent rules for pronouncing “c” and “g”?
@B.ClayShannon: The one you mentioned in your comment... "agua = ah-wah". I've never heard that before.
Jun
5
comment Learning Spanish
Welcome to our site! It's really hard to identify an actual question here. There's also a lot of background information that isn't really relevant (that you learned French in school, for instance). Can you try to focus your question?
Jun
5
comment Are there consistent rules for pronouncing “c” and “g”?
@B.ClayShannon: Where is that pronunciation used? I'm not familiar with it in Mexico.
Jun
4
comment What is the implied noun in “empanada”?
@Tony: I'm not sure why "sweeties" came to mind first... "sweets" would be the more common word, and I have updated the answer accordingly.
May
28
comment What is the difference between “es” and “está”?
@Em1: My mistake, you are correct.
May
27
comment El autor del cuento del 'vagabundo'
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about locating a piece of literature, rather than about the Spanish language.