4,898 reputation
11865
bio website verbally.flimzy.com
location Guadalajara, México
age 34
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen 4 mins ago

I'm a full-time software developer, working from home for a company in Atlanta, GA. I from Wichita, KS but have been living in Guadalajara, Mexico for the last year, and will stay here until sometime early 2012.

Soy ingeniero de software, y trabajo para una empresa de Atlanta, Georgia, EEUU Soy de Wichita, Kansas, EEUU, pero he estado viviendo en Guadalajara, México desde junio de 2010. Voy a regresar a EEUU en enero de 2012.


Oct
16
comment Punctuation with “sino”
@WendiKidd: Please don't use comments to ask additional questions; but please, feel free to ask additional questions :)
Sep
6
comment What's the best way to inform a pedestrian or fellow cyclist that I'm about to pass them?
A bell is the right term in English. And I'm thinking very seriously about buying one (even though I think it will look funny on my cyclocross bicycle... :)
Sep
1
comment Are there any studies regarding the future viability of the inverted question mark (¿)?
I have edited the title of your question to be more along these lines. I hope it's still within the spirit of what you are asking.
Aug
23
comment Comparing two opposing things
This may be scemantis, but in English you also cannot compare opposites; you can only contrast them. Which is what your statements actually do. "My friend is more intelligent than you" is actually a statement of contrast, not of comparison.
Aug
8
comment Marmot vs Groundhog
For things like this, where a word is only used in an area where Spanish is not natively spoken, it's common to use the native (English, in this case) word. I could very easily see a Spanish-speaker living in the northern U.S. say "Ayer vi un Groundhog".
Aug
6
comment Standalone Gerunds in Phrases
I agree. In Spanish, the infinitive is used alone--at least in most cases.
Aug
3
comment What is the significance of the gender of a noun in Spanish?
@JoJo: English sometimes does use gender on objects with no sexual organs. "She sure is a beautiful ship!"
Aug
2
comment What is the significance of the gender of a noun in Spanish?
There is one case where English is less ambiguous than Spanish WRT genders, and that is the third person pronouns. Spanish uses only "su", where English uses "his" or "hers". It's one case where I can get back at my Spanish speaking friends for teasing me when I make gender mistakes... when they say "his" when they mean "hers"...
Aug
2
comment What is the significance of the gender of a noun in Spanish?
I think this is far too broad for a single question. You have 4 or 5 distinct questions here. Many of them are very good questions, but need to be asked separately (some of them have). I encourage you to focus on one specific aspect per question; and by all means, ask as many questions as you like!
Jul
23
comment Does “Prima” have a double-meaning (in Mexico)?
Good addition... thanks!
Jul
22
comment Is capitalisation of 'Yo' not important?
@Jojo: english.stackexchange.com/a/7988/9983
Jul
15
comment Exception to the Phonetic Rule
@LeonardoHerrera: I don't know if "usually" is accurate, but that is does seem like a likely common mis-spelling. Wikipedia mentions 3 others, too.
Jul
10
comment How do you say “carpet” in Mexican Spanish?
Keep in mind that Mexican Spanish and U.S. Spanish are distinct dialects.
Jul
9
comment Exception to the Phonetic Rule
@Newbie: Uhm, but the 'G' is silent in Güey. That's the whole point.
Jul
9
comment Exception to the Phonetic Rule
@Newbie: What's your point? The ¨ changes the pronunciation of the gu from "g" (English) to "gw" (English). But Güey is not pronounced this way. It is pronounced as wey (English). According to phonetic spelling rules, it should be pronounced as gwey (English). The umlauts change the pronunciation, yes. But they don't make the G silent.
Jul
8
comment Exception to the Phonetic Rule
@Newbie: No, the 'G' is silent--at least as I've ever heard it pronounced, and according to wikipedia.
Jul
6
comment Exception to the Phonetic Rule
MikO: I wonder if you think the OP is asking for examples where English and Spanish differ in their phonetic spellings? Your answer might make sense in that context; but that's not what the question is about.
Jul
6
comment Exception to the Phonetic Rule
@RahilArora: That's what I thought you meant, and this answer doesn't address that.
Jul
6
comment Exception to the Phonetic Rule
@WalterMitty: Saying that "México" should be "Méjico" is an over-simplification. But read about that here.
Jul
6
comment Exception to the Phonetic Rule
The OP does ask for exceptions to the phonetic rules--look at the title. And "Words that are spoken differently than the way they are spelled" is another way of saying exactly the same thing. And the words in your answer are spelled exactly as they are spelled.