4,899 reputation
11865
bio website verbally.flimzy.com
location Guadalajara, México
age 34
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen Apr 16 at 15:33

I'm a full-time software developer, working from home for a company in Atlanta, GA. I from Wichita, KS but have been living in Guadalajara, Mexico for the last year, and will stay here until sometime early 2012.

Soy ingeniero de software, y trabajo para una empresa de Atlanta, Georgia, EEUU Soy de Wichita, Kansas, EEUU, pero he estado viviendo en Guadalajara, México desde junio de 2010. Voy a regresar a EEUU en enero de 2012.


Dec
17
comment “¿Qué haciendo?” and “¿qué estás haciendo?”
It's a more close equivalent of "What doing?" which I have also heard in English, and it sounds quite idiotic to me. Although I think it's a regionalism even in English, so perhaps I'll soften my chiding a bit.
Dec
16
comment Is the spanish 'YA' synonymous of 'already' and 'yet' without exceptions?
"Ya" is never a synonym of "already" and "yet," since it's in a different language. It often translates to one of these two words, but it can be translated other ways as well.
Dec
14
comment Is the spanish 'YA' synonymous of 'already' and 'yet' without exceptions?
Related: spanish.stackexchange.com/q/38/12
Dec
14
comment Is the spanish 'YA' synonymous of 'already' and 'yet' without exceptions?
It's not clear to me what you're asking. Are you asking for all of the possible translations of "ya" to English? Are you asking why English grammar and Spanish grammar are different? Are you asking how to properly use 'ya'? I don't actually see a question. This reads like a rant at the moment.
Dec
13
comment Indio can mean Indian, Indigene, and Hindu also?
"Indian" has multiple meanings in English, too... "Native American," "Indian" (one from India), or "Hindu" (broadly speaking--as most Hindus come from in or near India)
Dec
12
comment Origin of “Te echo de menos.”
You are right. I did ask for the literal meaning. And the literal meaning is explained in the other answers. Your explanation does not provide the literal meaning, but rather a misinterpretation, based on applying Spanish rules of grammar on a phrase taken from Portuguese. What your answer does is essentially the same as trying to explain the common French phrase "bon appétit" using English rules of grammar, or Spanish rules of grammar. The French phrase is common in both English and Spanish, but any explanation in either English or Spanish will be, quite simply nonsensical.
Dec
12
comment Origin of “Te echo de menos.”
This is, of course, the natural way one would parse the phrase, but it doesn't make any sense, which is why I asked the question. The other answers explain why it doesn't make sense: It's because this is completely the wrong way to parse the sentence. It's simply a nonsensical phrase, due to its origins in another language.
Dec
11
comment How do I say ‘Watching him eat makes me hungry’?
The first one would be much more common, in my experience.
Dec
11
comment Mejico or Mexico?
Related: spanish.stackexchange.com/q/245/12
Nov
18
comment Analysis and Translation of the song “Mientras duermen los niños” by Jose Luis Perales
Some of your "brain teaser" questions might make for good stand-alone questions on this site, if they boil down to an ambiguity or other missed meaning in the Spanish prose.
Nov
18
comment Analysis and Translation of the song “Mientras duermen los niños” by Jose Luis Perales
Your edit, adding the "brain teasers" has changed the question from merely "off-topic" to also "too broad" and "primarily opinion based." I encourage you to read through our help section, to better understand the scope and intent of this site.
Nov
18
comment Analysis and Translation of the song “Mientras duermen los niños” by Jose Luis Perales
@hhh: Nobody is saying that translating songs, or analyzing them is not a good idea, or helpful for language study. But these activities are off-topic for the Stack Exchange network. This is a Q&A site; we invite your questions, and hope to provide answers. But we are not a translation service, and discussion topics, like analyzing a work, are not a good fit for the Q&A format.
Nov
18
comment Analysis and Translation of the song “Mientras duermen los niños” by Jose Luis Perales
If you have a specific question about the meaning of a particularly difficult phrase or word in context while translating the song, that sort of question could be on-topic here. But asking for a translation of a block of text is expressly off-topic according to the site scope.
Nov
13
comment List of most commonly used Spanish words
@TomAu: Done. Good suggestion.
Nov
6
comment Are there any studies regarding the future viability of the inverted question mark (¿)?
The question is asking for studies. Your answer provides an opinion. Do you have any references to back your conclusions?
Nov
5
comment Spanish for “Of course”
<removed obsolete comments>
Oct
31
comment Spanish for “sink”
Some other words that come to mind are lavamanos and lavabo, but I'm sure there are a ton more--just as there are in English.
Oct
22
comment How to translate “about”?
@Gorpik: Thanks, corrected.
Oct
21
comment How to translate “about”?
"sobre" is more common for this context, although "acerca de" is neither unheard of nor incorrect.
Oct
16
comment Punctuation with “sino”
@WendiKidd: Please don't use comments to ask additional questions; but please, feel free to ask additional questions :)