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Soy programador de computadoras de tiempo completo para eFolder, Inc, y trabajo de forma remota. Soy de Wichita, KS pero he estado viajando del mundo desde junio de 2013.


I'm a full-time software developer for eFolder, Inc, working remotely. I from Wichita, KS but have been traveling the globe since June, 2013.


Sep
11
comment Bien vs buen/bueno/buena to describe something good
@JuanCespedes: bien is almost never a noun, in common usage. It's almost always an adverb. See here. It's a noun when it's used like the English word "goods", but that's not a common usage.
Sep
8
comment When and why is a “determiner” necessary for a subject?
@guifa: I'm looking forward :)
Sep
8
comment Cuál es el significado de la palabra “hay” en “qué hay sobre”
Edité tu pregunta para eliminar la segunda pregunta (sobre las definiciones de "cómico" y "tebeo"). Si quieres hacer otra pregunta sobre eso, estaría bien, pero te recomiendo que ves un diccionario antes.
Sep
8
comment I need help memorizing Spanish idioms: is there a pattern between the words that I miss?
This question is very broad, asking about at least 8 phrases (and possibly more questions, depending on how you break up your question about memorization vs. meanings, etc). I encourage you to ask one question per phrase/doubt you have. This will make it possible for us to provide much more specific answers, and will make the answers far more accessible to future visitors as well!
Sep
8
comment Origen y uso de “buen provecho” en Puerto Rico - Local Use and Meaning
Specifically, what is your question? Just it's meaning and origin? Or are you asking why it's acceptable to say it to strangers, or why a Spanish phrase is used more than a French one? :)
Sep
8
comment Origen y uso de “buen provecho” en Puerto Rico - Local Use and Meaning
This seems quite common to me in every Spanish speaking country I have visited (which isn't that many... but all over Mexico, Guatemala, and Spain)
Sep
8
comment Using El, La, Los and Las when it seems that they should not be used
I don't think the use of the article has anything to do with the question. Perhaps grammatically the definite article is required in that case, but in the case of "Yo amo la cena" the definite article is also used, and I would say preferred (or am I wrong?). Spanish simply uses definite articles a lot more than English (perhaps this is explained by the "number of reasons that [you] won't get into")
Sep
1
comment Can “mi” be used as a regular pronoun?
Your second use is not-grammatical, but "El libro es para mí" is correct. I'm not entirely sure what you mean by "regular" pronoun--what makes one pronoun more or less regular than another?
Sep
1
comment Meaning of 'Elícito'
Bienvenido a nuestra página!
Aug
28
comment Are there any differences between “de nada” and “por nada”?
"Por nada" is a common reply to "Gracias" as well, at least in Latin America.
Aug
28
comment Are there any differences between “de nada” and “por nada”?
This simply isn't true. Both are used heavily in Mexico.
Aug
21
comment What's the position of my tongue when I speak Spanish 'd'?
@lampe: This really does appear to be a duplicate of your earlier question. This question is slightly more specific, but the answer on the other question answers the question of tongue placement. Is there something specific you feel needs to be expounded upon?
Aug
21
comment What's the position of my tongue when I speak Spanish 'd'?
I think this is a good answer, for what it is, but it doesn't actually address tongue position, which was what the question was asking about. Do you care to elaborate on that point?
Aug
21
comment “Tener tiempo” vs “Llevar tiempo”
Entonces decir "Tengo mucho tiempo sin ir al cine" no es correcto, sino "Tengo 2 meses sin ir al cinema" es correcto?
Aug
20
comment The word ending “-ita/-ito” and its usage
@Gorpik: Ah right... they say "camarera" in Mexico, too, but it refers primarily to a hotel maid :)
Aug
20
comment The word ending “-ita/-ito” and its usage
@Gorpik: A fair observation. I was challenged by another user on that point... but your point is more compelling. I have rolled back to my original version.
Aug
19
comment Why is the ampersand retained in this translation?
& is a shortening of the Latin et, from which the Spanish y is derrived. When you consider this, your question seems a bit backwards--why does English, which is not derived from Latin, use &? But that's a question for another site :)
Aug
18
comment The word ending “-ita/-ito” and its usage
@EmilioGort: "Vamos, estamos tarde!" "Sí! Ahorita voy... solo tengo que poner mi maquillaje." <--- Un contexto común en que quiere decir "in just a moment." Y otro ejemplo: "¿Qué me dijiste?" "Ahorita te digo." <-- Un ejemplo en que quiere decir "Never" (pero claro es un ejemplo de ironía).
Aug
18
comment When the Moors conquered Spain did Spaniards already speak Spanish?
This sounds more like a question for History.SE. But it's a bit unclear... if you're asking about the history of the Spanish language, of course, it would be on-topic here. Why do you ask?
Aug
14
comment What words are typically used to refer to vehicles and deliniate between types of vehicles in Latin America
@DavidSopko: Then you understand why open-ended questions like this don't work well in this Q&A format. There are literally dozens, if not hundreds, of words which can be used to describe different types of vehicles, and in different contexts (formal, slang, etc). Even specifying "every day speech" is not specific enough, as there are still dozens of types of vehicles. To make this question sufficiently narrow, it must focus on a specific word or concept.