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Nov
24
comment What books explain Spanish's difficulties?
Welcome to our site. Our community determined early on that we were not well suited to answering questions about learning resources in our format. Usually resources such as Amazon.com (which I know you use) are much better able to provide recommendations for these sorts of things. I hope, though, that you'll stick around, and find other aspects of our site helpful.
Nov
9
comment ¿Hay algún equivalente en castellano al inglés “TL;DR”?
¿Por qué no "En resumen"?
Nov
9
comment How did the syntactical strucutre “me gusta” come to be in Spanish? It seems to be different from its Latin root and other Romance languages
I'm not sure what I meant re: my point #1. Re: the rest, I would encourage you to edit your question to focus on the Spanish etymology of the verb, rather than the comparison with Portuguese.
Nov
9
comment How did the syntactical strucutre “me gusta” come to be in Spanish? It seems to be different from its Latin root and other Romance languages
What might make for a better question is asking why the Portuguese use of "gostar" changed from the French, Spanish, and English syntax... but of course that question would belong on Portuguese.SE. A survey of the other Romance languages' use of this word would also be interesting.
Nov
9
comment How did the syntactical strucutre “me gusta” come to be in Spanish? It seems to be different from its Latin root and other Romance languages
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is about general verb forms, and not specific to Spanish.
Nov
9
comment How did the syntactical strucutre “me gusta” come to be in Spanish? It seems to be different from its Latin root and other Romance languages
English has the same word, "gust", which is now obsolete, but the negative form, "disgust" is still in common usage and has the same form as in Spainsh (i.e. "Bananas disgust me"). So the answer to your question is basically "they're different verbs," and sadly has nothing to do with Spanish, per se. So I'm going to close this question as off-topic. But if you want to ask some other question specifically about Spanish and gustar, feel free.
Oct
7
comment “la corbata” vs “la gorbata”
@guifa: I also encourage you to answer. It's nice to "share the rep," but rep ought to be considered a side-effect here, and not the primary reason to post. What's most important is providing valuable content, and "making the Internet a better place."
Sep
16
comment RAE: Dios existe pero los seres extraterrestres no. ¿?
I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is about the motives of the publishers of a dictionary, and has nothing to do with the Spanish language.
Sep
3
comment Idiomatic translation of “elevator pitch”
@fedorqui: Thanks for noticing!
Sep
3
comment Idiomatic translation of “elevator pitch”
I think it's a reasonable guess. I was just hoping to find some evidence to prove you right... but Google thwarted my efforts!
Sep
3
comment Idiomatic translation of “elevator pitch”
I thought I'd test your theory that "elevator pitch" is more common, but neither "elevator pitch" nor "discurso del ascensor" has any hits in Google ngrams viewer for Spanish. :/
Sep
2
comment How to translate “for dummies” to something more polite than “para tontos”?
How about "idiotas?" Would "Windows para Idiotas" have a similar ring as the English title? ("for Idiots" is another popular English brand, spun off of the popularity of the For Dummies books)
Sep
2
comment How to translate “for dummies” to something more polite than “para tontos”?
IMHO, "for Dummies" is pretty harsh in English, too. But I think that's part of why it works; it's so harsh so as to be sarcastic, and some people find the humor appealing.
Aug
18
comment Why are telephone numbers sometimes verbally expanded?
@B.ClayShannon: You never hear "one eight-hundred..." in a TV/radio advertisement in English?
Aug
16
comment Am I the only who thinks “longitud” is a weird word for “length”?
Can you edit your question (and the title, especially) to not look like a "poll"/rant question, and focus on the objective part of your question?
Aug
9
comment Origin of the name “Jesucristo”
This is exactly the type of answer I'm looking for! I wonder if you can add some sources, especially for the second to last paragraph, about the origin of the two Spanish words.
Aug
7
comment Plurality of organizations
This is a good question. I believe the singular form is correct, but it may not be a hard and fast rule. For example, in American English, the singular form is usually used when referring to organizations (Codeacademy has...), but in British English the plural (Codeacademy have...).
Aug
5
comment Traducción: “America or burst”
Eso es correcto. "America or Burst" es un error intencional, en carácter con Balki, quien siempre dice las frases populares un poco incorrectas.
Jul
18
comment Definición de “pistear”
¿Usted puede elaborar un poco? Así, su respuesta no añade nada nuevo in comparación de las otras respuestas.
Jul
12
comment How to Quickly Determine if a Text is in Castilian or Latin-American Spanish
Calling European Spanish "Castillian" and Latin-American Spanish "Spanish" is incorrect. In fact, the main place where the name "Castilian" is standard, and "Spanish" is effectively rejected, is in certain South-American countries. In Spain, the terms are fairly interchangeable. See here.