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Dec
18
revised La única manera de
deleted 2 characters in body; edited tags
Dec
18
comment ¿Qué significa “nariz de bola”?
Gracias... y ¿qué significa?
Dec
18
asked ¿Qué significa “nariz de bola”?
Dec
18
comment “¿Qué haciendo?” and “¿qué estás haciendo?”
I don't think this is a bad guess, but guesses probably shouldn't be answers.
Dec
17
comment “¿Qué haciendo?” and “¿qué estás haciendo?”
It's a more close equivalent of "What doing?" which I have also heard in English, and it sounds quite idiotic to me. Although I think it's a regionalism even in English, so perhaps I'll soften my chiding a bit.
Dec
17
revised “¿Qué haciendo?” and “¿qué estás haciendo?”
added 12 characters in body
Dec
17
answered “¿Qué haciendo?” and “¿qué estás haciendo?”
Dec
17
revised “¿Qué haciendo?” and “¿qué estás haciendo?”
edited tags
Dec
16
comment Is the spanish 'YA' synonymous of 'already' and 'yet' without exceptions?
"Ya" is never a synonym of "already" and "yet," since it's in a different language. It often translates to one of these two words, but it can be translated other ways as well.
Dec
14
accepted Origin of “Te echo de menos.”
Dec
14
comment Is the spanish 'YA' synonymous of 'already' and 'yet' without exceptions?
Related: spanish.stackexchange.com/q/38/12
Dec
14
comment Is the spanish 'YA' synonymous of 'already' and 'yet' without exceptions?
It's not clear to me what you're asking. Are you asking for all of the possible translations of "ya" to English? Are you asking why English grammar and Spanish grammar are different? Are you asking how to properly use 'ya'? I don't actually see a question. This reads like a rant at the moment.
Dec
14
revised Is the spanish 'YA' synonymous of 'already' and 'yet' without exceptions?
edited tags
Dec
14
revised Is the spanish 'YA' synonymous of 'already' and 'yet' without exceptions?
deleted 1 characters in body
Dec
13
revised How do I say 'It feels like' in Spanish?
added 2 characters in body; edited title
Dec
13
answered How do I say 'It feels like' in Spanish?
Dec
13
revised Why is “Santiago” the equivalent of “James”?
edited tags
Dec
13
comment Indio can mean Indian, Indigene, and Hindu also?
"Indian" has multiple meanings in English, too... "Native American," "Indian" (one from India), or "Hindu" (broadly speaking--as most Hindus come from in or near India)
Dec
12
comment Origin of “Te echo de menos.”
You are right. I did ask for the literal meaning. And the literal meaning is explained in the other answers. Your explanation does not provide the literal meaning, but rather a misinterpretation, based on applying Spanish rules of grammar on a phrase taken from Portuguese. What your answer does is essentially the same as trying to explain the common French phrase "bon appétit" using English rules of grammar, or Spanish rules of grammar. The French phrase is common in both English and Spanish, but any explanation in either English or Spanish will be, quite simply nonsensical.
Dec
12
comment Origin of “Te echo de menos.”
This is, of course, the natural way one would parse the phrase, but it doesn't make any sense, which is why I asked the question. The other answers explain why it doesn't make sense: It's because this is completely the wrong way to parse the sentence. It's simply a nonsensical phrase, due to its origins in another language.