2,043 reputation
612
bio website careers.stackoverflow.com/…
location Amsterdam, The Netherlands
age 38
visits member for 3 years
seen Nov 5 at 0:30

Expat for last 10 years and counting.


Nov
25
comment Is it bad to address a young male as “señor”?
Besides using word “señor”, it's also quite unusual to use polite 3rd person form in casual situations in Spain.
Nov
23
comment Various translations of “ticket”
actually not "ticket", but "tique" or "tiquete"
Nov
23
comment Why are certain words ending in “a” masculine?
@hippietrail: it's also that all of these examples in slavic languages are "klimat, program, system, problem" etc. so not really a case of ending with "a".
Nov
22
comment Age range of niño, chico, muchacho, joven, etc
as side note: "muchacho" isn't much used in Spain.
Nov
22
comment Is there a standard, most common, or most neutral Spanish term for “chat room”?
@Filmzy: messenger, as Windows Live Messenger (f. MSN Messenger), it definitively had private groups, not sure about public ones.
Nov
22
comment How to translate “make it count”
BTW. "chance at opportunity"? Isn't that pleonasm? In Spanish both words translate to "oportunidad"
Nov
21
comment Are there any subtle differences between “de nuevo” and “otra vez”?
@GonzaloMedina: actually native Spanish speaker (from Spain) would say exactly that. Example: atrapalo.com/viajes/…
Nov
21
comment Are there any subtle differences between “de nuevo” and “otra vez”?
@GonzaloMedina: I do agree that they are very similar. But it you look at examples at spanish.about.com/cs/vocabulary/qt/againqt.htm, you'll see that these sentences will just not sound good if you exchange "de nuevo" for "otra vez". I do agree that other way around it works.
Nov
19
comment Why are certain words ending in “a” masculine?
@Brian: it is, and yes, voda is feminine.
Nov
18
comment Is/Was there a Basic Spanish?
@Hauser: what makes you think Conquistadors were interested in bringing education?
Nov
18
comment Usage of “adiós” in the Basque country
I'd say in fact saying adiós is not that common in Spain. It's much more common to hear hasta luego, hasta mañana, chao (that's Spanish spelling of ciao, and unlike Italians, Spaniards only use it for goodbye).
Nov
18
comment Why are certain words ending in “a” masculine?
@Flimzy: kind of doubt it ;-) it's just with very few Greek-origin exceptions (much less than in Spanish) in Slavic languages ending with "a" makes it feminine.
Nov
18
comment What is apercibido?
btw. I do agree that REA should have better search and find all the forms of the word.
Nov
18
comment Is there a standard, most common, or most neutral Spanish term for “chat room”?
well, most Spaniards just say "messenger" anyway ;-)
Nov
18
comment Names of letters “b” and “v”
Also in Spain is "be de Barcelona, ve de Valencia"
Nov
18
comment Regional use of “genial”
It's very commonly used in sarcastic way.
Nov
18
comment How to decide between “ahora” and “ya” for the sense “now”?
For example "Estoy occupado actualmente" would mean "I'm currently busy", while "Estoy occupado ahora" would mean "I'm busy right now". But on the other hand "Ahora vivo en Madrid" would be equivalent to "Actualmente vivo en Madrid" (later sounding more formal).
Nov
18
comment When to use ya and todavía
I'd add word "aún" to the question.
Nov
18
comment Why are certain words ending in “a” masculine?
Another non-greek example: "el vodka". Always confuses me, because it's feminine in Slavic languages.
Nov
16
comment How important are accents in written Spanish?
x = por (como en multiplicacion), k = ke, xk = por que