1,993 reputation
510
bio website careers.stackoverflow.com/…
location Amsterdam, The Netherlands
age 37
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen Mar 17 at 11:15

Dec
12
answered Differences between “aun”, “hasta”, and “incluso” to indicate extremes?
Dec
12
answered Difference between 'trabajar para' and 'trabajar por'
Dec
12
comment Translating “young man” and “young woman”
IMHO, more common masculine counterpart for "señorita" than "joven", is "caballero". At least in Spain.
Dec
12
answered Computer science, software engineer/developer, and programmer
Dec
8
comment Why is “Usted” grammatically a third person?
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T-V_distinction
Dec
5
answered judging something as poor (objectively) , bad (emotionally)
Dec
2
comment Words for strong or weak rain (sprinkling, drizzling, pouring)
diluvio literally means deluge.
Dec
2
answered Translation of 'I was the one who did it'
Dec
1
comment Translating medicine names to Spanish
+1 for Wiki. Also good to know, that same generic might be sold under plethora of brand names, many of which are specific to local market.
Nov
28
answered Definition of escuela and colegio
Nov
27
comment Various translations of “ticket”
@hippietrail: might be so, but this site is not dedicated to Spanglish, but to Spanish.
Nov
27
comment Various translations of “ticket”
@hippietrail: that doesn't make it a word in Spanish.
Nov
25
answered “xq” in Internet slang/abbreviations
Nov
25
comment Is it bad to address a young male as “señor”?
Besides using word “señor”, it's also quite unusual to use polite 3rd person form in casual situations in Spain.
Nov
24
answered “vaso de agua” or “vaso con agua”? Which is correct?
Nov
24
awarded  Supporter
Nov
23
comment Various translations of “ticket”
actually not "ticket", but "tique" or "tiquete"
Nov
23
comment Why are certain words ending in “a” masculine?
@hippietrail: it's also that all of these examples in slavic languages are "klimat, program, system, problem" etc. so not really a case of ending with "a".
Nov
22
answered Does using “tío” imply a negative opinion?
Nov
22
comment Age range of niño, chico, muchacho, joven, etc
as side note: "muchacho" isn't much used in Spain.