Reputation
5,981
Next tag badge:
106/100 score
12/20 answers
Badges
21 32
Impact
~325k people reached

Jan
28
comment Translation of “Take ___ for granted”
@jrdioko these expressions also match the definition you give. Indeed it seems that the expression in English has those 2 meanings as well as it's stated here: idioms.thefreedictionary.com/granted
Jan
28
comment Translation of “Take ___ for granted”
@Laura of course. I wanted to express that it was used with "something" but forgot to remove "lo". Thanks.
Jan
28
comment What is “ya va” in Venezuelan Spanish?
Both "ya va" and "ya voy" are also used in Spain
Jan
27
comment Translation of “Who are you writing to”
are you sure that the second one isn't "¿A quién le escribes?"?
Jan
26
comment Translation of “What was your name again?”
@Laurayeah, thanks, there are so many ways..., I've included them
Jan
23
comment What's the meaning of “me choca” expression?
in Spain it is used too and is quite informal. It usually means something like "I was surprised by"
Jan
22
comment Why do definitions use 'que' rather than 'lo que'
"lo que lee" would be "the thing that is read"(which may be a book) and doesn't mean the person who reads. Maybe you mean "el que lee".
Jan
21
comment What is the verb landarse (to be it in a game of tag)?
@jrdioko "se" it's just a reflexive pronoun there which means that the action is taken over himself. "la" would be "the obligation of chasing the rest of the people". RAE says that in Nicaragua "andar" can mean "to take something with him" so it is maybe used as a reflexive verb in that meaning. Maybe someone from Nicaragua can explain it better. The use of verbs as reflexive or not is sometimes strange, but for example in Spain I've heard more "se la queda" than "la queda" which may be the equivalent of it.
Jan
21
comment Reflexive and non-reflexive third person
@AlfredoO I'd always perceive "su propia" as that it belongs to him and it's not the same saying "su propia" as "la propia".
Jan
21
comment Reflexive and non-reflexive third person
@AlfredoO Can you understood that the food is of another person in "Él se comió su propia comida"? I'd never think that.
Jan
21
comment Reflexive and non-reflexive third person
+1 for it refers to his/her not someone else's unless the context can give that idea
Jan
21
comment Reflexive and non-reflexive third person
You 2 sentences for avoiding ambiguity are good options, but in the first one "propio" should be "propia" because it's an adjective for "comida" which is a femenine word (so the adjective must be femenine as well). I don't edit it so you can notice it.
Jan
20
comment What is the verb landarse (to be it in a game of tag)?
I never heard it in Spain. We use: "Pablo la lleva", "Pablo la tiene" or "Pablo (se) la queda (just in the moment he has started to be it)". This game is also known in some countries as "la anda" and they say "la anda" for "to be it". Maybe you misunderstood "Pablo se landa" and they really had said "Pablo se la anda".
Jan
20
comment Translation of “too good to be true”
@Icarus thanks, added
Jan
20
comment Translation of “too good to be true”
@leonbloy thanks, I've updated it's used in Mexico :)
Jan
19
comment Are there any words in Spanish that are very difficult to translate to English?
I think it's much more difficult to translate it when it means "a feeling of inspiration" like in flamenco rather than when it means the mythical creature. It's even difficult to define it in Spanish. Related answer: spanish.stackexchange.com/a/1162/105
Jan
19
comment Are there any words in Spanish that are very difficult to translate to English?
quedar may be translated as "meet": We have met at 6 o'clock
Jan
19
comment Insect bites vs. stings
I've often heard that "avispas" (wasps) "muerden" or "pican" depending if they use their "mouth" or their sting. Indeed in google some people say that male wasps "muerden" while female wasps "pican". But I'm not an expert in wasps. Anyway, "me ha mordido una avispa" is common in Spain.
Jan
19
comment Are there any words in Spanish that are very difficult to translate to English?
The names of products or meals from the country are usually quite difficult to translate, for instance: "chorizo" or "salchichón".
Jan
19
comment Translation of “let me know”
@Filmzy yeah you're right, though "házmelo saber" is also a common for it