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seen Oct 29 '13 at 20:07

Mar
15
comment Best way to translate 'uneducated', meaning lacking formal schooling
@Icarus I'm referring just to Spain not in general. It may be used widely by the average speaker in other countries.
Mar
15
comment Best way to translate 'uneducated', meaning lacking formal schooling
At least in Spain, I'm sure that many people wouldn't even know what "iletrado" means, because it's not a word widely used by an average native speaker.
Mar
15
comment Best way to translate 'uneducated', meaning lacking formal schooling
maybe you can add to the list "analfabeto" (someone who can't read or write because he has never gone to school).
Mar
14
comment How to respond to ¿Cómo estás?
This question can be hard to answer because there may be a very long list. Without thinking too much about it: mal, muy mal, regular, genial, tirando, mejor, bastante bien, fatal... depending in how you feel and the situation.
Mar
13
comment Are “burro” and “aburrir” related?
I've often heard this funny silly sentence. — Me aburro... — !Pues cómprate un burro! ;) It's just a play on words because of the similarity in spelling of both words.
Mar
12
comment Plug vs Socket: Interchangeable?
@César people tend to make things as short as possible so they would just say "conecta el enchufe" (it's obvious where) or just "enchúfalo". One of them is "enchufe macho" and the other is "enchufe hembra", but people uses just enchufe because most of the time it's understood by the context which one is. es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enchufe
Mar
7
comment Waterfall: cascada vs. catarata
I don't agree. I'm from Spain and I use and hear "catarata" for big waterfalls like "Cataratas de Iguazú", "Cataratas del Niágara" or "Cataratas Victoria".
Mar
6
comment Different words for “servant”
Of course you're right. I didn't want to mean that it couldn't mean servant in other situations as the one I mentioned before that a servant in a building work is called in that way in Spain.
Mar
6
comment Different words for “servant”
Well in Spain "peón" is also used in that way, but I wouldn't say it's a servant. It's just someone who is manipulated by another person (maybe even without being aware of it). So we can call him things like "peón" (because it's manipulated as the pieces in a chessboard) or "títere"/"marioneta" (because it's controlled as a puppet).
Mar
6
comment Different words for “servant”
In Spain, "criada" is the same as "sirviente" (maybe "criada" has more negative connotations). "Lacayo" is used for those servants which went with the knights in the past. And "peón" is used for servants in building works. ("Peón" and "Lacayo" are not not negative in Spain).
Mar
6
comment Different words for “servant”
In Spain the equivalent of "Ama de llaves" for a man is usually called "Mayordomo" (instead of Amo de llaves, though it is also correct but far less common). And those terms refers to the servant with more responsibilities in the house.
Mar
1
comment Gusto variant of the verb gustar
@chronoz yeah "gusto" and "gustó" are very different, for that reason accent marks are important in Spanish.
Feb
29
comment Why does “toalla” sound like “tualla”?
@Alfredo O OK, maybe it's something regional or I have never noticed that in Spain.
Feb
29
comment Why does “toalla” sound like “tualla”?
I have never heard the word "toalla" pronounced as "Tualla" in Spain. And in the link you give I hear clearly "toalla" (not "tualla") in the 6 recordings.
Feb
22
comment Is “mas sin embargo” a pleonasm?
@AlfredoO I think "pero sin embargo" is also a pleonasm. By the way, aren't pleonasms a way of emphasizing?
Feb
22
comment Is “mas sin embargo” a pleonasm?
@Laura I think the problem is that "mas" is less used than "pero". It's common to read things like "Mario tiene que hacer muchas tareas, pero sin embargo está jugando."
Feb
22
comment Difference between “mas” and “más”
"Mas" can mean "pero" but also "sino". But "mas" is a very formal way for both meanings; for that reason people tend to use the other options.
Feb
22
comment Difference between “mas” and “más”
@MikMik yeah you're right. They are just pronounced in the same way when they are alone. The "tónicas" are stressed in the entonation of a sentence while the "átonas" are linked to the next "tónica" word (forming like a "whole word" in pronunciation). Here is a good article about that: blog.lengua-e.com/2011/palabras-tonicas-y-palabras-atonas
Feb
17
comment What is the difference between “De nada” and “No hay de qué”?
@Flimzy I have updated that answer. Feel free to change anything I've added/changed if you don't agree.
Feb
16
comment What is the difference between “De nada” and “No hay de qué”?
@Flimzy the correct spelling is "no hay de qué". "Qué" is used not only in direct and indirect questions but also in direct/indirect exclamations.